accelerometer

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ac·cel·er·om·e·ter

(ak-sel-er-om'ĕ-ter),
An instrument for measuring the rate of change of velocity per unit of time.

accelerometer

Any instrument used to measure acceleration.

Typically, accelerometers contain a small mass, connected to a stiff spring, with some electrical means of measuring the spring deflection when the mass is accelerated; the type of accelerometer used in gait analysis is usually very small and measures acceleration in one direction, but can be clustered for two- and three-dimensional measurements.

accelerometer

(ak″sel-ĕ-rom′ĕ-tĕr) [ acceler(ation) + -meter]
An instrument that detects a change in the velocity of the object to which it is attached. The device may be designed to record the changes and indicate the direction(s) of the acceleration.
References in periodicals archive ?
At all distances in which accelerometers are placed, vibration can be detected.
Model MS9000 sensors are MEMS capacitive accelerometers developed for precision inertial systems for land, sea, and air applications.
On the other hand, it is important to mention that in the bibliography there are works in which modifications are made in the geometry of the accelerometers, both in their mass (US Patent, 2011) and in the form of suspension beams.
The first result of this preliminary study was that stride variables and vertical stiffness could be accurately estimated using 100-Hz GPS-embedded triaxial accelerometers.
This method also is incredibly precise but, like accelerometers, laser vibrometry is time consuming, measuring only a single point at a time.
All accelerometers are completely insensitive to rotations about the gravitational field vector and cannot be used to determine such a rotation.
Meggitt claims the flexibility of its pod accelerometer mounting system will revolutionise vibration sensor testing.
The calibration of a USB ICPDigital[TM] Dynamic Accelerometer is NIST traceable, ensuring the precision of the integrated measurement channel.
z]) readings because accelerometers are sensitive to both linear acceleration and the local gravitational field.
Of course, these fingerprints are only visible when accelerometer data signals are analyzed in detail.
ActiLife ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers (Pensacola, Florida) were applied to each subject to measure limb segment accelerations.