acceleration

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acceleration

 [ak-sel″er-a´shun]
1. a quickening, as of the pulse rate.
2. in physics, the time rate of change of velocity.
psychomotor acceleration generalized physical and emotional overactivity in response to internal and external stimuli, such as that seen in the manic phase of bipolar disorder.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-sel-er-ā'shŭn), Avoid the mispronunciation uh-sel-er-ā'shŭn.
1. The act of accelerating.
2. The rate of increase in velocity per unit of time; commonly expressed in g units; also expressed in centimeters or feet per second squared.
3. The rate of increasing deviation from a rectilinear course.
[see accelerator]

acceleration

[aksel′ərā′shən]
Etymology: L, accelerare, to quicken
an increase in the speed or velocity of an object or reaction. Compare deceleration. accelerate, v.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-selĕr-āshŭn)
The rate of change of velocity.

acceleration

change in motion of a body or object: the rate of change of velocity with respect to time. linear acceleration: the rate of change in linear velocity with respect to time; related to force by Newton's second law of motion (often stated as force = mass×linear acceleration). Measured in metres per second squared (m.s-2). angular acceleration: the rate of change in angular velocity with respect to time. Measured in degrees per second squared (°. s -2) or radians per second squared (rad.s-2); related to moment by Newton's second angular law of motion (moment = moment of inertia×angular acceleration). tangential acceleration: the acceleration of an object or body acting at a tangent to its direction of motion, e.g. when it is moving in a circle or around a curve. instantaneous acceleration: acceleration measured over a very short (infinitesimal) period of time, effectively a continuous measurement of acceleration. See also gravitational acceleration.

acceleration,

n in osteopathy, the process of increasing speed or velocity of a manipulative technique.

ac·cel·er·a·tion

(ak-sel-er-ā'shŭn) Avoid the mispronunciation uh-sel-er-ā'shŭn.
1. The act of accelerating.
2. The rate of increase in velocity per unit of time; commonly expressed in g units; also expressed in centimeters or feet per second squared.
3. The rate of increasing deviation from a rectilinear course.

Patient discussion about acceleration

Q. What herbs are known to be helpful against Arthritis acceleration?

A. mind you- herbs most of the time contain the same medication that pills do but without an exact amount and accompanied with other materials. there is great danger in that area, here is a guide for choosing a herbal supplement that will give you some tips :
http://www.arthritis.org/at-supplement-guide.php

More discussions about acceleration
References in periodicals archive ?
This clause reflects a view that acceleration clauses are of dubious enforceability.
Although the company believes that there has been no material adverse change, under generally accepted accounting principles short-term obligations that can be refinanced on a long-term basis subject to a subjective acceleration clause are considered current liabilities, rather than long-term debt.
The restricted shares are on a 5-year "cliff" vesting period with an acceleration clause if certain Kforce price thresholds are met.
On February 26, 2015, the Company delayed the release of its fourth quarter and year-end operating results, citing its need for more time to evaluate the classification of its revolving credit facilities as current liabilities or long-term obligations under ASC 470-10-45, "Classification of Revolving Credit Agreements Subject to Lock-Box Arrangements and Subjective Acceleration Clauses," notwithstanding that the facilities do not contractually mature within the next twelve months.
Specific areas requiring close attention in the due diligence process were the asset/liability measurement tests, income acceleration, hedge identification, tax indemnities and gross ups, acceleration clauses, and rating triggers.
8 billion and adopting contractual documentation for its refinancing that does not contain capital repayment step-up nor rating-related acceleration clauses