Acanthamoeba Keratitis

Acanthamoeba Keratitis

A sight-threatening disease with a favourable prognosis if diagnosed and treated early. Acanthamoeba keratitis follows minor corneal trauma, and is usually associated with contact lens use. Amoebae are introduced to the cornea of otherwise healthy people through environmental exposure—e.g., swimming whilst wearing contact lenses or using contaminated contact lens solutions, especially if homemade. Corneal infection does not lead to systemic disease, but is associated with cataracts, hypopyon, and increased intraocular pressure.
Epidemiology 1–2/million/year; 1/10,000/year contact lens wearers
Clinical findings Foreign-body sensation, pain, tearing, photophobia, blepharospasm, blurred vision
Management Propamidine, miconazole nitrate, and neomycin; or propamidine isethionate, a cationic antiseptic (polyhexamethylene biguanide or chlorhexidine)
References in periodicals archive ?
6] Ocular injury with muddy implements is associated with Acanthamoeba keratitis.
Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) can infect anyone who fails to clean their lenses properly, or keeps them in a dirty case, yet few people are aware of the condition.
29) There is evidence that topical steroid treatment might mask the radial keratoneuritis and pseudodendritic lesions that are characteristic in early stage Acanthamoeba keratitis.
3] Clinical characteristics of Acanthamoeba keratitis infections in 28 states, 2008 to 2011.
Now it has been well established that Acanthamoeba is becoming a potential threat to contact lens users and can lead to Acanthamoeba keratitis among ocular patients (Sreenivasan et al.
Corneal ulcer, including bacterial keratitis, fungal keratitis and Acanthamoeba keratitis, can cause corneal opacity, deteriorated visual acuity or even lead to some lifelong complications," the authors write as background information in a report in the Archives of Ophthalmology.
London's Moorfields Eye Hospital found massive geographical variations in the rate of acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) infection across both England and Wales.
A contact lens solution manufacturer voluntarily withdrew one of its products Saturday after federal health officials said an investigation had linked it to the rare but potentially blinding eye infection Acanthamoeba keratitis, the New York Times reported.
US government officials linked the solution to acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) - a painful eye infection that can lead to permanent vision loss or blindness in rare cases.
Heightened concern for these organisms in public health risks surfaced in the early 1970s when the amoeba Acanthamoeba castellanii was discovered causing an infection called Acanthamoeba keratitis.
People who use monthly disposable soft lenses are most at risk of picking up the infection acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), researchers from Moorfields Eye Hospital in London found.