Acanthamoeba Keratitis

Acanthamoeba Keratitis

A sight-threatening disease with a favourable prognosis if diagnosed and treated early. Acanthamoeba keratitis follows minor corneal trauma, and is usually associated with contact lens use. Amoebae are introduced to the cornea of otherwise healthy people through environmental exposure—e.g., swimming whilst wearing contact lenses or using contaminated contact lens solutions, especially if homemade. Corneal infection does not lead to systemic disease, but is associated with cataracts, hypopyon, and increased intraocular pressure.
Epidemiology 1–2/million/year; 1/10,000/year contact lens wearers
Clinical findings Foreign-body sensation, pain, tearing, photophobia, blepharospasm, blurred vision
Management Propamidine, miconazole nitrate, and neomycin; or propamidine isethionate, a cationic antiseptic (polyhexamethylene biguanide or chlorhexidine)
References in periodicals archive ?
A YouGov poll for Fight for Sight revealed that a large proportion of UK contact lens wearers are putting their eyesight at risk through unsafe habits, unaware that they could develop infections like Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK).
Contact lens wearers exposed to any water source are at highest risk for developing Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK), a severe corneal infection that can result in painful blindness.
Professor Fiona Henriquez and her research team at the University of THEWEST of Scotland are investigating the causes and potential cure for acanthamoeba keratitis.
All types of contact lenses have been associated with acanthamoeba keratitis, particularly daily wear soft contact lenses.
UK researchers have confirmed an uptick in cases of Acanthamoeba keratitis, an eye infection that most often affects contact lens wearers.
The team from the University College London (UCL) found that the risk of developing the disease Acanthamoeba keratitis was more than three times greater amongst people with poor contact lens hygiene, people who did not always wash and dry their hands before handling their lenses, reported health news.
Medical experts have highlighted Acanthamoeba keratitis, which is an infection of the cornea that can be incredibly painful and contact lens wearers are thought to be most at risk.
Acanthamoeba keratitis is an eye disease that causes the front surface of the eye, the cornea, to become painful and inflamed, due to infection by Acanthamoeba, a cyst-forming microorganism.
Hundreds of cases of acanthamoeba keratitis were recorded in a study in southern England.
This comes after University College London found that rates of Acanthamoeba keratitis, have nearly tripled at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London since 2011.
documented that in countries with a high prevalence of contact lens wear, 85%-88% of Acanthamoeba keratitis cases occurred in contact lens users (1).