tenure

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tenure

Academia A status granted to a person with a 'terminal' degree–eg, doctor of medicine–MD or doctor of philosophy–PhD, after a trial period, which protects him/her from summary dismissal; tenured academicians are expected to assume major duties in research, teaching and, if applicable, Pt care fostering, through their activities, the academic 'agenda' of their respective departments or institutions. See Endowed chair, Lecturer, Professor. Cf Chair.

tenure

(tĕn′yĕr) [L. tenēre, to hold]
1. The holding of a property, place, or occupational assignment.
2. The specification that an employee (typically someone in an academic setting) may hold a position permanently unless he or she behaves with gross negligence.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lawrence White, Academic Tenure: Its Historical and Legal Meanings in the United States and Its Relationship to the Compensation of Medical School Faculty Members, 44 St.
A review of academic tenure in radiologic technology.
Our model explores the role of contractual damages in replacing academic tenure (i.e., reinstatement) as well as addressing the problem of revelation.
Academic freedom was becoming more accepted, along with academic tenure as a deterrent to threats against academic freedom, due process, and of the professor's role in decision-making, commonly called shared governance (Mortimer, 1985).
In this article, recent university ratings in the UK Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) are examined with the aim of testing an efficiency theory of academic tenure. The results suggest that differences in performance exist between universities that could claim to have hard tenure before the 1988 Educational Reform Act and those that could only claim a softer form of tenure.
First, to provide a rationale in support of academic tenure for teachers who risk being controversial in their attempt to teach the skills of critical thinking and the pursuit of academic truth.
Block, "Academic Tenure: An Economic Critique," reprinted from the Harvard Journal of Law and Public Policy in De George, Academic Freedom and Tenure, 156.
A woman's lack of interaction with peers and with the academic department or the institution becomes a serious problem as she attempts to negotiate her way through increasing responsibilities as a more senior faculty member and accomplish the research and publication of scholarly work (and obtain the funding necessary for that work) on the road to promotions and academic tenure (Fox, 1995).
Interested people or observers of higher education can also find out about governance (chapter 5), the role of research (chapter 6), indirect costs in funding (chapter 6), and academic tenure (chapter 5).
Proposals to limit or abolish academic tenure could drive up the cost of going to college.
Chapter 5 develops several themes showing that academic tenure has desirable efficiency properties.
Here we have another fine example of reckless "realism." Draper's solidarity with such a political culture - and thus, incidentally, with servants of state such as McNamara - is shared by battalions of "the best and brightest" graduates of higher education, well trained by equally loyal professors and well rewarded when they, too, receive academic tenure or are recruited by various think tanks, policy kitchens, and corporate boards.

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