abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction

/ab·strac·tion/ (ab-strak´shun)
1. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
2. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is further from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face; cf. attraction (2).

abstraction

[abstrak′shən]
Etymology: L, abstrahere, to drag away
a condition in which teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures are inferior to their normal position, away from the occlusal plane. Also called infraclusion, or infraocclusion.

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

abstraction (abstrak´shən),

n teeth or other maxillary and mandibular structures that are inferior to (below) their normal position; away from the occlusal plane.
References in periodicals archive ?
Again, in this study, we use the term abstract data type.
Programming can be approached in a completely different manner by designing objects through the use of an abstract data type.
In this feature you learn about the concepts that make up an object-oriented language, starting with the building stone (classes and objects), then progressing in the more advanced terms (abstraction, abstract data types, encapsulation, inheritance and polymorphism).
The comparison function is integrated into a conceptually polymorphic abstract data type (Appendix B), which also allows the encapsulation of additional data, on which the return value of the comparison function may depend.
Formally, an abstract data type A is formed by a ground set, optional auxiliary sets, and methods.
In order to illustrate the use of the framework of abstract data types in queries, they must be embedded in a query language.
To achieve a smooth interplay between the embedding language and an embedded system of abstract data types, a few interface facilities and notation are needed, expressible in one form or another in most object-oriented or object-relational query languages.
Package that structure in a language that supports abstract data types.
The meaning of a form depends on a store of knowledge that includes extended abstract data types for defining elementary data items, a database scheme defined by an entity-relationship model, and a conceptual model of an ordinary form.
Our new technology will enable the modeling of all information assets, including images, maps, Web pages and other user-defined abstract data types.
Ironically, this resulted in two more program-level abstractions, namely, abstract data types [5, 29, 42, 44, 49, 50] and process abstraction [13, 14, 30, 31, 52].
OSMOS is truly object-oriented database management system, supporting all key features of the object paradigm, including the storage of objects as the basic unit of information, object definition through the use of abstract data types and classes, encapsulation of structural and behavioral semantics via properties and operations, and inheritance, overriding and polymorphism.