abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
Programming can be approached in a completely different manner by designing objects through the use of an abstract data type. This structural design is illustrated in Figure 4.
Abstract data types are types that the C# language does not support upon installation.
The comparison function is integrated into a conceptually polymorphic abstract data type (Appendix B), which also allows the encapsulation of additional data, on which the return value of the comparison function may depend.
To achieve a smooth interplay between the embedding language and an embedded system of abstract data types, a few interface facilities and notation are needed, expressible in one form or another in most object-oriented or object-relational query languages.
Meyer [29], for example, concentrates on class development using formal specification of abstract data types (ADTs) to define behavior and provides examples on how to transform a functional design to an object-oriented design to an object-oriented Yourdon [12] present an object-oriented analysis (OOA) method, using data modeling techniques, in which they define the system architecture in terms of assembly and classification structures.
Abstract data types provide a mechanism with which we can reason mathematically about programs that use sophisticated data structures.
My friend, Jim Coplein, points out, "C+ + is the direct inheritor from Simula." He is correct, but only in the sense that C++ inherited the clever programming tricks (e.g., abstract data types) that were first conceived in Simula.
Abstract data types hide the implementation details of a data structure, but the abstraction, if improperly done, might bring about a loss of efficiency.
The authors then present their own approach, which is based on the notion of abstract data types. It looks quite natural since the notion of information hiding is relevant here.
For example, Herlihy and Liskov [14] have taken this approach using the CLU language, though they suggest that it can be used with any language that supports abstract data types. Similarly, Emerald [8] is a language that supports multiple representations of objects across different machines, but again the assumption is that all interoperating programs are written in the same language, namely Emerald.
The meaning of a form depends on a store of knowledge that includes extended abstract data types for defining elementary data items, a database scheme defined by an entity-relationship model, and a conceptual model of an ordinary form.