abstraction

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abstraction

 [ab-strak´shun]
1. the mental process of forming ideas that are theoretical or representational rather than concrete.
2. the withdrawal of any ingredient from a compound.
3. malocclusion in which the occlusal plane is farther from the eye-ear plane, causing lengthening of the face.

ab·strac·tion

(ab-strak'shŭn),
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
See also: odontoptosis.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
See also: odontoptosis.
3. The making of an abstract from the crude drug.
See also: odontoptosis.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
See also: odontoptosis.
5. The processes or the results of discernment of formulation of general concepts from specific examples, and/or ascertainment of a given aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
1. Distillation or separation of the volatile constituents of a substance.
2. Exclusive mental concentration.
3. The making of an abstract from a crude drug.
4. Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
5. The process of selecting a certain aspect of a concept from the whole.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]

ab·strac·tion

(ăb-strak'shŭn)
Malocclusion in which the teeth or associated structures are lower than their normal occlusal plane.
[L. abs-traho, pp. -tractus, to draw away]
References in periodicals archive ?
The assumption that the statue's outer appearance quite possibly denotes the truly angelic nature of Mens-[Greek Text Omitted] opens a number of interpretive possibilities that would deserve extended study but can here only be sketched out.(70) First and foremost the statue in Dubrovnik may itself provide a telling piece of evidence that personifications of abstract concepts, especially of virtues, were in the perception of the High Middle Ages and Renaissance occasionally interchangeable with angels.(71) In fact, both the Greek and Latin components of Mens-[Greek Text Omitted] turn out to be under specific circumstances compatible with her presumptive angelic nature.
Wormeli, a speaker on secondary education, innovation, and teacher professionalism, reveals the potential of physical, verbal, and visual metaphors and analogies as a way to help students understand, compare, and connect abstract concepts and processes.
The traditional section was in lecture format whereas the experimental section was in mostly discovery format; Students in the experimental group discovered definitions of basic abstract concepts mostly through visual-based Mathematica notebook demonstration, whereas the students in the traditional group were given the definitions.
For instance, with training, captive dolphins readily apply learned rules to new situations, grasp abstract concepts, and understand an artificial, grammar-based language.
Employing a conversational writing style and real-life applications to illustrate abstract concepts, this text presents difficult material in step-by-step fashion.
It is also unclear, Caramazza adds, whether Damasio's theory applies to grammatical categories, such as verbs that require a direct object, and to knowledge of separate abstract concepts, such as justice and ambition.
It does not teach techniques or drawing skills, but rather explains the different roles of drawing across disciplines: for playfulness and creativity, meaning, feeling and emotion, observation, understanding abstract concepts, and designing.
This document provides hands-on, cost efficient, fun activities for students to help them better understand abstract concepts in genetics.
Guided by carefully crafted instructions, computers can animate abstract concepts, display familiar objects and create new worlds beyond the realm of human experience -- sometimes with startling results.
Glannon (law, Suffolk University Law School) demystifies civil procedure by providing concrete examples of procedural doctrines and rules in operation, together with full explanations of how these abstract concepts apply to each example.
The findings suggest that fiction in education courses may give abstract concepts memorable concreteness, aquaint students with multiple ways of knowing, and elicit student self-interrogations concerning large life questions.