privilege

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privilege

(prĭv′ĭ-lĭj) [L. privilegium, law affecting a single person, prerogative]
1. A right granted to a person in recognition of some special status, e.g., a right to practice one's profession in a health care facility.
2. An immunity from commonly imposed standards or laws.
References in periodicals archive ?
The trial judge questioned whether an absolute privilege should apply in the case, but nonetheless granted a summary judgment motion for the attorney, holding that the Supreme Court had held that "statements made during the course of a judicial proceeding are entitled to an absolute privilege," in Levin, Middlebrooks, Mabie, Thomas, Mayes & Mitchell, P.
Paul, 66, said: "It has been an absolute privilege to serve Shropshire and meeting the legal needs of the community and I am looking forward to continuing for some years to come.
To have the opportunity of partnering with an organisation so esteemed as the DEC is an absolute privilege," he said.
Tarun Kapoor, Managing Director, Audi Delhi West said, 'It has been an absolute privilege and honour to be associated with Audi in India.
We, therefore, consider it an absolute privilege to be playing our small role in reigniting the passion and popularity of hockey in the country.
However, over the last three decades I've built up enough memories of a truly wonderful sport to last a lifetime, and it's been an absolute privilege to have written about it in the Racing Post for 15 years.
Personally I can't wait it will be a week never to forget and to be a part of it is an absolute privilege.
It is an absolute privilege to be honoured with such a coveted recognition," said Mr Mithaiwala.
It's been my absolute privilege to serve my country for the last 29 years as an aerial porter.
News organizations are not seeking an absolute privilege to withhold information.
Brendan Williams, D-Olympia, have introduced measures that would give professional journalists absolute privilege on protecting confidential sources, the same exemption from testifying in court that is granted to spouses, attorneys, clergy and police officers.
The court rejected the plaintiff's contention that the privilege is not an absolute privilege.