abrasion

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Related to Abrasions: concussion

abrasion

 [ah-bra´zhun]
1. the wearing away of a substance or structure, such as the skin or teeth, through some unusual or abnormal process.
2. a wound caused by rubbing or scraping the skin or a mucous membrane; a “skinned knee” and a “floor burn” are common examples. To treat the injury, the wound should be washed, a mild antiseptic or antibiotic ointment applied, and the wound covered with sterile gauze.
air abrasion a type of microabrasion in which a jet of air blows tiny particles against the tooth or cavity surface.

a·bra·sion

(ă-brā'zhŭn),
1. An excoriation, or circumscribed removal of the superficial layers of skin or mucous membrane. Synonym(s): abraded wound
2. A scraping away of a portion of the surface.
3. In dentistry, the pathologic grinding or wearing away of tooth substance by incorrect tooth-brushing methods, the presence of foreign objects, bruxism, or similar causes. Synonym(s): grinding Compare: attrition.
[see abrade]

abrasion

(ə-brā′zhən)
n.
1. The process of wearing down or rubbing away by means of friction.
2.
a. A scraped or worn area.
b. A scraped area on the skin or on a mucous membrane, resulting from injury or irritation.

abrasion

Dentistry
The wearing away of enamel.
 
Dermatology
A scrape; superficial injury to a mucocutaneous surface caused by rubbing or scraping from a sharp object, resulting in an area of body surface denuded of skin or mucous membrane; a partial-thickness injury of the skin.

Forensics
Graze, grazing wound, which can occur naturally (e.g., falling off a push-bike on gravel) or unnaturally (e.g., being thrown from a vehicle in an RTA/MVA).

Industry
The wearing away of surface material, such as refractories in an incinerator or parts of solid waste-handling equipment, by the scouring action of moving solids, liquids, or gas; the removal of surface material from any solid through the frictional action of another solid, liquid or gas, or a combination thereof.

Pathology
The wearing away of a substance or structure, such as the skin or the teeth, through a mechanical process.

abrasion

Dentistry The wearing away of enamel Dermatology A scrape; superficial injury to a mucocutaneous surface caused by rubbing or scraping from a sharp object, resulting in an area of body surface denuded of skin or mucous membrane Pathology The wearing away of a substance or structure–such as the skin or the teeth through a mechanical process

a·bra·sion

(ă-brā'zhŭn)
1. An excoriation, or circumscribed removal of the superficial layers of skin or mucous membrane.
Synonym(s): abraded wound.
2. A scraping away of a portion of the surface.
3. In dentistry, the pathologic grinding or wearing away of tooth substance by incorrect tooth-brushing methods, the presence of foreign objects, bruxism, or similar causes.
Synonym(s): grinding.
See: abrade
See also: bruxism
Compare: attrition

abrasion

(a-bra'zhon) [L. abradere, to scrape]
1. Wearing away of the substance of a tooth. It usually results from mastication but may be produced by mechanical or chemical means.
Enlarge picture
ABRASION
2. Scraping away of skin or mucous membrane as a result of injury or by mechanical means, as in dermabrasion for cosmetic purposes. See: illustration; avulsion; bruise

pleural abrasion

Mechanical pleurodesis.

abrasion

Wearing away of tissue by sustained or heavy friction between surfaces. Abrasion of the biting surfaces of teeth is common. Skin abrasions are among the commonest of all minor injuries. Deliberate abrasion in the cosmetic treatment of ACNE scars or other disfigurement is called dermabrasion.

Abrasion

Also called a scrape. The rubbing away of the skin surface by friction against another rough surface.
Mentioned in: Corneal Abrasion, Wounds

a·bra·sion

(ă-brā'zhŭn)
1. In dentistry, the pathologic grinding or wearing away of tooth substance by incorrect tooth-brushing methods, the presence of foreign objects, bruxism, or similar causes.
Synonym(s): grinding.
2. An excoriation or circumscribed removal of the superficial layers of skin or mucous membrane.

Patient discussion about abrasion

Q. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. My brothers eczema is very vulnerable to allergens. In spite of steps taken to eliminate this we have not succeeded much. His medicines do not help him. They cannot cure this immune disorder. They have started showing some side effects. His fight for eczema tic itching starts again once he stops his medicines. Eczema tic itching leads making his skin reddish and abraded. If any diet can help then please guide?

A. Though food can also trigger eczema symptoms. Thus you must avoid cow`s milk, eggs, shellfish. Avoid dusty areas, pollution. His doctor would have told about the allergens to be avoided just follow them. You can also make him have raw food. It’s said that they help reduce on the return of the symptoms. Use anything as natural as possible, like soaps, clothing and anything which is unnatural. This will help for the eczematic impact to reduce.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6OUi3KAUCog&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/v6OUi3KAUCog_eczema_tips?q=eczema&feature=player_embedded

More discussions about abrasion
References in periodicals archive ?
Tooth surface loss is a composite terminology which broadly covers non-carious tooth surface loss due to attrition, abrasion, abfraction and erosion.1,2
In the case of corneal abrasions, overwhelming data showing no benefit won out.
Key words: Murree Formation, sandstone, siltstone, aggregate, Loss Angeles abrasion test.
Pain from an abrasion is some of the most severe discomfort you can experience.
Abrasion injuries result in damage only to the surface layer of skin (epidermis), and while typically classified as minor in nature, can engender player discomfort and consequently result in a change in playing behaviour.[1] Strategies to reduce the incidence of abrasion injuries in sport are therefore desirable.
Controls were intentionally, completely unmatched to allow for statistical assessment of a wide range of risk factors for abrasions. Therefore, the control cohort was not matched to the CA group in terms of age, type of surgery, day of surgery, or anesthesia team.
Comment: The authors concluded that corneal abrasions are fairly common (and undiagnosed) in infants and that doctors should be careful in attributing unexplained persistent crying to the pain of corneal abrasions.
The people who became infected were those who had the abrasions, and not those who had intact skin."
In response to abrasions, 5 of the 58 players on the team developed abscessed Staphylococcus aureus infections that were resistant to drugs in the penicillin family and to antibiotics called macrolides.
Q: A resident picks at her skin, causing a type of skin abrasion. Where do these wounds go on the MDS?