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fold

 [fōld]
plica; a thin margin curved back on itself, or doubling.
amniotic fold the folded edge of the amnion where it rises over and finally encloses the embryo.
aryepiglottic fold a fold of mucous membrane extending on each side between the lateral border of the epiglottis and the summit of the arytenoid cartilage.
circular f's the permanent transverse folds of the luminal surface of the small intestine.
costocolic fold a fold of peritoneum passing from the left colic flexure to the adjacent part of the diaphragm; called also phrenicocolic ligament.
gastric f's the series of folds in the mucous membrane of the stomach.
gluteal fold the crease separating the buttocks from the thigh.
head fold a fold of blastoderm at the cephalic end of the developing embryo.
interdigital fold the free border of the web connecting the bases of adjoining digits.
lacrimal fold a fold of mucous membrane at the lower opening of the nasolacrimal duct.
mucosal fold (mucous fold) a fold of mucous membrane.
nail fold the fold of palmar skin around the base and sides of the nail of a finger or toe.
neural fold one of the paired folds lying on either side of the neural plate that form the neural tube.
semilunar fold of conjunctiva a mucous fold at the medial angle of the eye.
serosal fold (serous fold) a fold of serous membrane.
spiral fold a spirally arranged elevation in the mucosa of the first part of the cystic duct.
tail fold a fold of the blastoderm at the caudal end of the developing embryo.
transverse f's three permanent transverse folds in the rectum.
ventricular fold (vestibular fold) a false vocal cord.
vestigial fold a pericardial fold enclosing the remnant of the embryonic left anterior cardinal vein.
vocal f's true vocal cords.

fold

(fōld),
1. A ridge or margin apparently formed by the doubling back of a lamina. Synonym(s): plica
2. In the embryo, a transient elevation or reduplication of tissue in the form of a lamina.

fold

(fōld)
n.
1. A crease or ridge apparently formed by folding, as of a membrane; a plica.
2. In the embryo, a transient elevation or reduplication of tissue in the form of a lamina.

fold

(fōld)
1. A ridge or margin apparently formed by the doubling back of a lamina.
See also: plica
2. In the embryo, a transient elevation or reduplication of tissue in the form of a lamina.

fold

(fōld)
A ridge or margin apparently formed by the doubling back of a lamina.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The new design features large above the fold universal IAB ad units that are integrated into a clutter free environment which improves viability and performance.
Highlight your key product(s) in the upper right of your home page, Cyabove the fold.' Above the fold refers to the upper half of your web page, where information is visible to a user without them having to scroll down or take any further action.
Bonus points for full TripAdvisor integration via one of the four 'above the fold' tab-spots.
The important part for human visitors, opposed to robotic search engine visits, is what is "above the fold" and their experience on your destination page.
Fourth and finally, move confidentiality "above the fold" in your marketing program.
When his then-partner picked up a copy in London, she initially saw only his photograph above the fold and thought he'd been killed.
16, the Sunday Post arrived, with the lead article above the fold on the front page about peanut allergies.
"If you can imagine what it is to wake up on Sunday morning, you have got 20 of your family members coming to lunch, and you are above the fold in a place typically reserved for terrorists and cars that have been bombed, it's very unsettling," Ringgold said.
We'd read Thomas Kunkel's piece (Above the Fold, February/March) about how students embraced the assignments in his feature writing class.
On April 12, 2000, the Post ran an article, prominently placed on the front page above the fold, titled "U.S.
Watson likes four headlines above the fold, but has no set formula for the right number of stories for a page.
16, the Times printed its first front-page color photographs -- victorious Cleveland Indians above the fold, a pensive U.S.