Abortion Act 1967

(redirected from Abortion Act of 1967)

Abortion Act 1967

A Parliamentary Act which provides the legal framework for abortions performed in the UK. Most abortions are performed under clause C of the Act; abortions may be performed if “…the pregnancy has not exceeded its 24th week and if the continuance of pregnancy would involve risk, greater than if the pregnancy were terminated, or injury to the physical or mental health of the pregnant woman.” In practice, most abortions performed in the UK are carried out for social reasons.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Rachel, 47, is one of nine people, all with conflicting views about abortion, brought together in debate on the 50th anniversary of the Abortion Act of 1967.
The Abortion Act of 1967 states that no one with a conscientious objection can be obliged to participate in abortion procedures.
I was born right between the British Abortion Act of 1967 and the US Supreme Court decision of 1973 Roe v Wade.
I was 24 when the law changed (England's Abortion Act of 1967 legalizing the procedure), and I remember it.
It is time the Abortion Act of 1967 was overhauled.
This account has charted the progress of anti-abortion protest since the Abortion Act of 1967.
Before an abortion can go ahead, The Abortion Act of 1967 says a consent form called a HSA1 must be signed by two doctors.
THE Abortion Act of 1967 revolutionised the situation in England by allowing doctors to perform an abortion where two other doctors agree.