Abortion Act 1967


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Abortion Act 1967

A Parliamentary Act which provides the legal framework for abortions performed in the UK. Most abortions are performed under clause C of the Act; abortions may be performed if “…the pregnancy has not exceeded its 24th week and if the continuance of pregnancy would involve risk, greater than if the pregnancy were terminated, or injury to the physical or mental health of the pregnant woman.” In practice, most abortions performed in the UK are carried out for social reasons.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Abortion Act 1967 covers England, Scotland and Wales, allowing controlled abortion, but doesn't extend to Northern Ireland.
the abortion service shall comply with the abortion act 1967, as amended
"The Abortion Act 1967 reformed the law relating to abortion but does not apply in Northern Ireland, where the framework for abortion therefore differs from other parts of UK.
DUP chief whip Sir Jeffrey Donaldson said 100,000 people are alive in Northern Ireland today because the Abortion Act 1967 was not accepted.
Scotland's Chief Medical Officer Dr Catherine Calderwood told health boards the drug misoprostol could be taken by women away from hospitals, using powers available under the Abortion Act 1967.
"Ministers are utilising an existing power available within the Abortion Act 1967. This is not a change to abortion law and has been done following extensive clinical guidance."
The Abortion Act 1967 permits termination of a pregnancy by a registered medical practitioner subject to certain conditions, for instance the pregnancy has not exceeded 24 weeks.
The Abortion Act 1967 permits termination of a pregnancy by a medical practitioner subject to certain conditions, for instance the pregnancy must not have exceeded 24 weeks.
F John Smith Grangetown, Cardiff This undermines 'rights' arguments FIFTY years ago MPs approved the Second Reading of the Abortion Act 1967 on the basis of lies, with a massive House of Commons vote of 233 for and 29 against.
On February 24 we talked preliminarily about the 292 to 201 defeat of an amendment to Section 5 of the Serious Crime Bill which read, "Nothing in section 1 of the Abortion Act 1967 is to be interpreted as allowing a pregnancy to be terminated on the grounds of the sex of the unborn child."
This has now severely restricted the legal protection of conscientious objection, which in Section 4 (1) of the Abortion Act 1967 says: "No person shall be under any duty to participate in any treatment authorised by this Act to which he has a conscientious objection."
Abortion only became legal in the UK with the Abortion Act 1967.