Abortion Act 1967

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Abortion Act 1967

A Parliamentary Act which provides the legal framework for abortions performed in the UK. Most abortions are performed under clause C of the Act; abortions may be performed if “…the pregnancy has not exceeded its 24th week and if the continuance of pregnancy would involve risk, greater than if the pregnancy were terminated, or injury to the physical or mental health of the pregnant woman.” In practice, most abortions performed in the UK are carried out for social reasons.
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No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act Establishes a government-wide prohibition on abortion funding and makes Hyde Amendment permanent.
Scotland's Chief Medical Officer Dr Catherine Calderwood told health boards the drug misoprostol could be taken by women away from hospitals, using powers available under the Abortion Act 1967.
Perhaps unique in legislation, the Abortion Act contains a conscience clause, as if Parliament were wary of wielding power over life and death.
FIFTY years have passed since the 1967 Abortion Act was signed into law, legalising terminations of foetuses up to 28 weeks gestation and within selective circumstances.
Ministers are utilising an existing power available within the Abortion Act 1967.
In England and Wales abortion care is provided by the state under certain circumstances, though under the 1967 Abortion Act the procedure is regarded as otherwise criminal.
The 1967 Abortion Act was transformative, bringing abortion out of the backstreets and in to the care of the NHS.
The Abortion Act 1967 permits termination of a pregnancy by a registered medical practitioner subject to certain conditions, for instance the pregnancy has not exceeded 24 weeks.
The Abortion Act 1967 permits termination of a pregnancy by a medical practitioner subject to certain conditions, for instance the pregnancy must not have exceeded 24 weeks.
Fifty years ago on October 27, 1967 the Abortion Act, proposed by David Steel MP, was passed and came into force on April 27, 1968.
On March 29, by a lopsided vote of 89-17, the South Carolina House of Representatives passed the Unborn Child Protection Against Dismemberment Abortion Act (H 3548) that outlaws the savage procedure of killing an unborn child by ripping and tearing the baby apart limb by limb.
Yes, there's a clause in the 1967 Abortion Act which allows doctors to conscientiously object to performing them but it needs to be changed.