abdominal examination

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abdominal examination

the physical assessment of a patient's abdomen by visual inspection, auscultation, percussion, and palpation. Visual inspection of the normally oval shape of the abdominal surface while the patient is supine may reveal abnormal surface features indicating the effects of disease, surgery, or injury. Subsurface tumors, fluid accumulation, or hypertrophy of the liver or spleen may be observed as an abnormal surface feature. Auscultation may reveal vascular sounds that provide information about arterial disorders such as aortic aneurysms and bowel sounds that indicate intestinal function. In pregnancy, auscultation can detect fetal heartbeat and blood circulation in the placenta. Percussion helps detect the condition of internal organs. Palpation is used to detect areas of tenderness or rigidity, muscle tone and skin condition, and shapes and sizes of subsurface organs or masses.

Abdominal Examination

A hands-on evaluation of the abdominal cavity to identify abnormalities, if any, based on any change in size, shape, consistency, or sound on percussion of the organs found therein.
Parameters assessed Ascites, ballotability, bowel sounds (normoactive, hyperactive, hypoactive, high-pitched, inaudible, tympanitic), costovertebral angle tenderness, distension, obesity, fluid wave, guarding, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, organomegaly, liver, spleen and kidneys (tender or not), McBurney's point (for appendicitis), Murphy's sign, palpable, nonpalpable, protuberant, rebound tenderness, scaphoid, surgical scars.

abdominal examination

Clinical medicine A hands-on evaluation of the abdominal cavity to identify abnormalities, if any, based on any change in size, shape, consistency, or sound on percussion of the organs found therein. See Abdomen.
References in periodicals archive ?
2] and abdominal exam revealed a large pannus draping over the groin (Figure 1).
For that same asthma patient, the physical exam should give the details of the heart and lung exam but should not include any mention of an abdominal exam unless one was actually done.
I can only presume the history was inadequate, which led to a failure to do an abdominal exam.
No abdominal pain was appreciated with light palpation, but a limited abdominal exam was performed due to her gravid condition.
It has been hard enough to communicate to women the need for continued annual exams (which also include height, weight, blood pressure, temperature, pulse, breast exam, thyroid exam, heart/lung/ abdominal exam, and more) even when they don't need a Pap smear or HPV test that year.
Her abdominal exam was significant for mild tenderness to palpation in the epigastric area without palpable masses, organomegaly or ascites.
The abdominal exam should focus on the presence or absence of ascites (fluid wave), an omental mass, or inguinal adenopathy.
The abdominal exam may not reveal this; a scan of the kidneys, ureters, and bladder may be needed.
Per abdominal exam revealed obliteration of Liver dullness, with tenderness all over.
An abdominal exam revealed right lower quadrant tenderness at McBurney's point with no rebound or guarding and a negative Rovsing's sign.
An abdominal exam yielded diffuse tenderness, which was most significant at the site of the abrasion.
During the abdominal exam, the health care provider should determine the presence of ascites based on the presence of a full, bulging abdomen.