ATHENS


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Abciximab vs. Tirofiban for Inhibition of Platelets During Coronary Stenting.
A trial comparing the antiplatelet and antithrombin effects and intensity of periprocedural GP IIb/IIIa inhibition of tirofiban vs. abciximab during non-urgent PCI stenting
Conclusion GP IIb/IIIa inhibition was suboptimal with both abciximab and tirofiban during PCI stenting
References in classic literature ?
Nor had he been long in Athens before he caught and chained a terrible mad bull, and made a public show of him, greatly to the wonder and admiration of good King Aegeus and his subjects.
It is the day when we annually draw lots to see which of the youths and maids of Athens shall go to be devoured by the horrible Minotaur!"
A few years before this time, there had been a war between the city of Athens and the island of Crete, in which the Athenians were beaten, and compelled to beg for peace.
"Let the people of Athens this year draw lots for only six young men, instead of seven," said he, "I will myself be the seventh; and let the Minotaur devour me if he can!"
There was the poor old king, too, leaning on his son's arm, and looking as if his single heart held all the grief of Athens.
Beholding them on the horizon, myself and all the people will know that you are coming back victorious, and will welcome you with such a festal uproar as Athens never heard before."
No indeed, men of Athens, neither I nor any other man.
I have seen men of reputation, when they have been condemned, behaving in the strangest manner: they seemed to fancy that they were going to suffer something dreadful if they died, and that they could be immortal if you only allowed them to live; and I think that such are a dishonour to the state, and that any stranger coming in would have said of them that the most eminent men of Athens, to whom the Athenians themselves give honour and command, are no better than women.
For if, O men of Athens, by force of persuasion and entreaty I could overpower your oaths, then I should be teaching you to believe that there are no gods, and in defending should simply convict myself of the charge of not believing in them.
There are many reasons why I am not grieved, O men of Athens, at the vote of condemnation.
And what shall I propose on my part, O men of Athens? Clearly that which is my due.
I speak rather because I am convinced that I never intentionally wronged any one, although I cannot convince you--the time has been too short; if there were a law at Athens, as there is in other cities, that a capital cause should not be decided in one day, then I believe that I should have convinced you.