Advanced Research Projects Agency Network

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Advanced Research Projects Agency Network

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ARPANET

Designed in 1969 as a network to link certain U.S. Department of Defense computers with university computers on campuses performing defense-related research. The ARPANET network became the basis for the Internet.
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Although reliability in the ARPANET was largely guaranteed by the IMPs operating in the core of the network, the existing layered architecture assigns responsibility for guaranteeing reliable transmission to the transport layer.
In 1978, Larry Roberts, formerly director of networking research at ARPA, wrote, "AT&T and its research organization, Bell Laboratories, have never to my knowledge published any research on packet switching." He also described how ARPA, in an attempt to commercialize the ARPANET, had approached AT&T about taking it over, but AT&T declined the opportunity.
The Net went commercial in the mid-70s, first with Telnet, the commercial version of ARPANET. Then came UNIX-to-UNIX CoPy (UUCP), from which evolved USENET.
NSF combined ARPANET with other networks, consolidating communications backbones, and formalizing the underlying protocols that enable separate networks - and separate types of computers - to communicate with each other.
Its first name was ARPANET, standing for the Advanced Research Projects Agency of the U.S.
No one could have predicted the success of the communications medium now known as the "Internet." It began in 1969 as a military program called "ARPANET," designed to enable military computers to communicate with one another by redundant channels, regardless of damage done to the network in the event of a war.
The Internet began in 1969 as the Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (ARPANET).
I had the opportunity to work with ARPANet, a network used by a nearby research facility to share ideas, communicate about engineering research projects, and send an early form of e-mail.
Department of Defense networking project termed ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network).
The "ARPANET," as it was originally called, was designed to connect research facilities in the United States and in allied countries, and allow scientists to easily exchange data and collaborate.
The Internet was originally called ARPAnet, created by the U.S.