ALSPAC


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ALSPAC

Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children, Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy And Childhood. A UK (Bristol) study designed to determine ways in which individual genotypes interact with environmental pressures to influence health and development.
Details ALSPAC now has comprehensive data from 10,000 children and parents, from early pregnancy to teen age; data collection will continue.
Data collected Changes in anthropometry, attitudes and behaviour, fitness and other cardiovascular risk factors, bone mineralisation, allergic symptoms, mental health.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, sexually abused youth are more likely to experience unplanned pregnancy in adolescence, and poor psychological functioning in adulthood (Roberts, O'Connor, Dunn, Golding, & The ALSPAC Study Team, 2004).
Griffiths LJ, Wolke D, Page AS, Horwood JP, ALSPAC Study Team.
and THE ALSPAC SURVEY TEAM 1997 'The relationship between condition-specific morbidity, social support and material deprivation in pregnancy and early motherhood' Social Science and Medicine 45, 1325-1336
North and ALSPAC Study Team (1999) "Does employment improve the health of lone mothers?
As research has shown, infant development can be hampered by a number of parental factors including the presence of maternal depression, (O'Connor, Heron, Golding, Beveridge, & Glover, 2002), parental age at the birth of the child, and a family history of psychiatric disorder (Sidebotham, Golding, & The ALSPAC Study team, 2001).
Professor Dieter Wolke, child psychologist and part of the ALSPAC study team who led the research project, said: "Over 60pc of mothers now go out to work, compared with 21pc 20 years ago, and this trend is likely to increase.
The ongoing research is being carried out under the ALSPAC project, (Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children), which is based at the University of Bristol.
The ALSPAC Study Team (Avon Longitudinal Study of Pregnancy and Childhood).
Kate North, one of the ALSPAC researchers, said it was difficult to quantify the effect of men's age on the likelihood of conception.