artificial intelligence

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ar·ti·fi·cial in·tel·li·gence

1. a branch of computer science in which attempts are made to replicate human intellectual functions. One application is the development of computer programs for diagnosis. Such programs are often based on epidemiologic analysis of data in large numbers of medical records;
2. a machine that replicates human intellectual functions, although no machine (that is, computer) can do this yet.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

artificial intelligence

Informatics The study of intelligence using ideas and methods of computation whose central goal is to understand the principles that make intelligence possible; a format of computer programming that attempts to simulate human 'intelligence.' See Bayesian network, Expert system, Machine learning, Neural networking, Symbolic reasoning.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

ar·ti·fi·cial in·tel·li·gence

(AI) (ahr-ti-fishăl in-teli-jĕns)
Branch of computer science in which attempts are made to replicate human intellectual functions. One application is the development of computer programs for diagnosis. Such programs are often based on epidemiologic analysis of data in large numbers of medical records.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

artificial intelligence

The characteristics of a machine designed to perform some of the perceptive or logical functions of the human organism in a manner appearing to be beyond the merely mechanical. AI is largely a matter of computer programming, in which stored records of past experience are made to modify future responses, but it also encompasses research into humanoid methods of data acquisition, the use of fuzzy logic and of artificial neural networks.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
These government programs will support ambitious major projects, startups and academic research in AI. The national effort also includes using AI in China's defense and intelligence industries; the country's leaders are not reluctant to use AI for (http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/02/china-s-massive-investment-artificial-intelligence-has-insidious-downside) social and political control .
(16) These recommendations cover issues as wide-ranging as: assessing the capabilities of the technology and the institutions using it; the need for explainability and transparency, possibly supported by auditing mechanisms; formulating redress or compensation processes; the need for appropriate metrics for AI trustworthiness; developing a new EU oversight agency responsible for the protection of public welfare through the evaluation and supervision of AI; creating financial incentives for cross-disciplinary activities and ethical AI; and supporting education curricula that cover the social and legal impacts of AI.
The primary intended audiences for the National AI R&D Strategic Plan are the US policymakers and federal funding agencies who support research and development in AI. While the plan does not stipulate specific funding programs for individual agencies, it does give a broad perspective on high-priority funding areas in AI for the federal government as a whole.
The aviation sector as well has seen major improvements, thanks to AI. Use of the technology in simulators is useful to train pilots in air warfare.
With more than 800,000 net-new jobs expected by 2021 as a result of new global business revenues, it is imperative that job seekers skill-up on AI. Trailhead is Salesforce's free, interactive, guided and gamified learning platform, where anyone can develop skills that empower them to land a job in the workplace of the future.
What we call "deep learning by themselves" is not indispensable for AI, but any computer program which can behave with human intelligence would qualify as AI.
On one hand, the occurrence and extent of the breach should be evaluated and corrective measures should follow; on the other, they indicate the need to establish early warning systems and additional control tools for AI.
Now she raises the question of what it is that we want to create--for instance, what human qualities we would like to see in AI. First, she deals with definitions of human nature, especially when it comes to the spiritual question of what it means to be created in the image of God (imago Dei).
The inexorable trend toward customization of products and services to a market of one demands intelligence-based systems like AI. Today's average consumer expects 24-hour convenience, multiple-channel delivery, and as close as possible to the exact product he or she wants - when he or she wants it.