Association for Gerontology in Higher Education

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Association for Gerontology in Higher Education

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AGHE

An agency that promotes the education and training of persons preparing for research or careers in gerontology and geriatrics. It is committed to the development of education, research, and public service and works to increase public awareness of the needs of gerontological education.
References in periodicals archive ?
For example, the AGHE was integrated in the latest reviews of the Dietary Guidelines, and the nutrient recommendations were expanded to encompass considerations for chronic disease.
In the AGHE, the cereals group is described as providing carbohydrates, protein, fibre and a wide range of vitamins and minerals; the milk group as providing calcium as well as protein, riboflavin and vitamin B12; fruits as providing vitamins, notably vitamin C and folate, natural sugars and fibre; and vegetables and legumes as providing vitamins especially vitamin A and C, folate, minerals, dietary fibre and carbohydrate.
AGHE publishes a National Directory, of Educational Programs in Gerontology.
Since the AGHE was developed, a new set of Dietary Guidelines (7-9) and a new set of Nutrient Reference Values (10) (NRVs) have been published with a wider range of nutrients and more values per nutrient.
The paper by Shrapnel and Baghurst in this issue addresses some of the implications for the AGHE of the new n-3, LCn-3, n-6 and vitamin D recommendations (as well as vitamin E) in relation to placement of unsaturated fats and oils in the current guide where, for the most part, they are placed in the 'extras' or 'non-core' food category.
In their dietary modelling exercise, the diets were based on the CFG recommendations, that is, the minimum number of serves to meet 70% of the old RDIs (rather than the increased food allocations modelled in the AGHE tables) and did not include the fats and oils allocation for cereal serves.
(6,10) However, substantial investment into research in communication and translation will be required as focus groups during the development phase of the AGHE indicated that messages on healthy fats were confusing to consumers.
In order to establish whether general nutritional adequacy and diabetes principles might be achieved from an intake pattern based on the reference food groups, they were compared with core food guide classifications outlined by AGHE and Food Guide Pyramid (9,10) and current practices aimed at controlling glycaemia.
Main outcome measures: Nutritional adequacy of the food basket as determined by comparison with recommended numbers of serves from the AGHE, the RDIs for the reference family and other quantified targets related to the Dietary Guidelines for Australians.
The quality of individual breakfasts was assessed by means of the number of the five food groups in the AGHE. Table 4 describes the scoring system adopted for the Food Group Score (FGS).
They mention behaviours, portion sizes, food labels, referring to changing family food supply, the AGHE, and drinking water, rather than attention to calorie, fat and sugar counting.
Objective: To undertake a content analysis of the types of foods advertised during programs, which have particular appeal to children and in timeslots where children are likely to be watching television and to assess conformity with the recommendations of the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating (AGHE).