ADL scale

ADL scale

Activity of daily living scale Clinical medicine Any of a number of instruments used to assess physical functions–eg, self-care, ambulation, food preparation, shopping, housekeeping, etc. See Barthel index, Framingham Disability scale, Instrumental ADL scale, Katz ADL scale, Kenny Self-Care scale, Performance test of ADL, Timed manual performance.
References in periodicals archive ?
[11] The S&E ADL scale is a tool of measuring a person's ability to perform daily activities in terms of speed and independence through a percentage figure.
The ADL Scale was developed in 1963.16 It includes six categories of activities: bathing, dressing, toilet needs, transfer, continence and feeding.17,18 Each item has three response options: dependent, partially dependent or independent.
Modifications of the ADL scale scores after 12 months of follow-up were considered as functional outcome variable of interest.
The overall mean scores [+ or -] SD of ADL scale and SF36 were 4.7 [+ or -] 0.75 and 26.8 [+ or -] 3.9, respectively.
Several instruments were considered to affect hours of formal care authorized; lagged scores on the TDADS ADL scale and IADL scale were chosen as they passed the overidentification tests and were strongly correlated with formal care.
A change of one category and 5 points was considered clinically significant for the Katz ADL scale and BI, respectively.
The Klein-Bell ADL Scale and Sickness Impact Profile are quite lengthy or cumbersome with more than 100 items each.
The ADL scale was scored on the basis of `no problem with the activity'/`any problem', and the adequacy with which it formed a hierarchical scale tested with a scalogram analysis [17].
The magnitude estimation ADL scale was strongly related to mortality (Figure 2).
Client and caregiver functional status was measured by a version of the Katz ADL scale (Katz and Akpom, 1976), Lawton and Brody's IADL scale (Lawton and Brody, 1969).
The ADL scale measures locomotor and neurologic aspects of basic functioning and has been shown to predict an elderly person's need for various types of service.
The ADL scale reflects clinician assessments of patient functioning and daily living skills in six domains: eating, bathing, grooming, dressing, transferring, and toileting.