ADH1A

ADH1A

A gene on chromosome 4q21-23 that encodes class-I alcohol dehydrogenase, alpha subunit, a member of the alcohol dehydrogenase family, which metabolise various substrates, including ethanol, retinol, other aliphatic alcohols, hydroxysteroids and lipid peroxidation products. The encoded protein plays a major role in ethanol catabolism and is highly expressed in adults livers.
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The variation in alcohol elimination and the oxidation of acetaldehyde, genetically determined alcohol dehydrogenase 1-3 (before named ADH1A, ADH1B and ADH1C) and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of the clinical syndrome.
Luo and colleagues [15-22] reported that the diplotypes at ADH1A, 1B, 1C, 4 and 7, CHRM2, OPRM1, OPRD1 and OPRK1 were much more strongly associated with alcohol dependence, drug dependence and personality factors than the alleles, genotypes and haplotypes at these sites.
2006) and modest evidence of association with noncoding SNPs (5) in ADH1A and ADH1B.
ADH1A contains either two alpha subunits or one alpha plus one beta or gamma subunit.
Of these, the ADH1A, ADH IB, and ADH 1C genes encode the majority of the ADH enzymes that metabolize alcohol in the liver.
One important group of ADH enzymes are the ADH class I isozymes ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C.
The ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C genes (1) produce closely related proteins that function as homo- and heterodimers (Hurley et al.
Humans have seven different genes, called ADH1A, ADH1B, ADH1C, ADH4, ADH5, ADH6, and ADH7, that encode medium-chain ADHs (see Table 1).
The ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C genes1 produce closely related proteins that function as homo- and heterodimers (Hurley et al.
There are three types of ADH1: ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C.
The class I ADH enzymes include ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C, which are considered the most important ADH isoforms in alcohol metabolism because they are present in the largest amounts and account for the majority of alcohol metabolism in humans (Jornvall and Hoog 1995).
These are three isozymes known as alpha ([alpha]), beta ([beta]), and gamma ([gamma]), which are encoded by the ADH1A, ADH1B, and ADH1C genes, respectively.