ABO blood groups


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Related to ABO blood groups: universal donor

ABO blood groups

A system of blood grouping developed from the discoveries of Karl Landsteiner (1868–1943) in 1900. The designations are arbitrary and the four groups are A, B, AB and O. These represent the antigenic differences in the red cells, the ANTIGEN being present on the red cell membranes. Group A, B and AB people have A, B and A and B antigens, respectively, on their red cells. Group O people have no antigens and are known as universal donors, whose blood, other things being equal, may safely be transfused into anyone. Group A people (about 26 per cent in Europe) have antibodies (agglutinins) to B in their serum and must not be given blood with B antigens. Agglutinins cause red cells with the same letter antigens to clump together and to become useless. Group B people (about 6 per cent) have antibodies to A in their serum and must not be given blood with A antigens. Group O people (about 68 per cent) have both A and B antibodies, so must not be given either A or B blood. Group AB people have no ABO blood group antibodies in their serum and are known as universal recipients. See also RHESUS FACTOR DISEASE and KELL BLOOD GROUP SYSTEM.

ABO blood groups

A system in which human blood is classified by whether the red blood cells contain A or B antigens. Type A blood has the A antigen; type B has the B antigen, AB has both, and 0 has neither.
Mentioned in: Transfusion
References in periodicals archive ?
Conclusions: The frequency of ABO blood groups in both Rh positive and negative subjects among the major Sudanese ethnic group was similar to that reported from neighbouring regions.
In other study, it was found that ABO blood group has been associated with plasma lipid levels, and particularly, the A blood group has been noted to have higher levels of serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.[40,41]
The frequency distribution of ABO blood group in the infertile group was the approximately same with fertile group.
However, some past researches provide evidence of equal distribution of ABO blood groups among diabetic and non-diabetic subjects 25.
ABO blood groups Frequency (%) A 5 (17.24) B 10 (25.64) AB 3 (7.69) O 21 (53.84) t-value 2.42 p-value 0.094 Table 3: Prevalence of malaria infection among different genotype of pregnant women attending General Hospital Minna.
Ghasembegloo, "ABO blood groups and susceptibility to brucellosis," Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol.
Table 5 demonstrates that frequency of loops is higher in both the Rh +ve and Rh -ve individuals of ABO blood group, followed by whorls and arches, except in Rh -ve blood group "A" and Rh -ve blood group "B" where the incidence of whorls predominates the loops.
ABO blood groups, Rhesus factor, and Behcet's disease.
Significant difference was noted in percentages of pre-hypertensive subjects among the ABO blood groups (p=0.001) (Table-1).