ABO system

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Related to ABO blood group system: Rh factor, blood transfusion

ABO system

(ā′bē-ō′)
n.
A classification system for human blood that identifies four major blood types based on the presence or absence of two antigens, A and B, on red blood cells. The four blood types (A, B, AB, and O, in which O designates blood that lacks both antigens) are important in determining the compatibility of blood for transfusion.

ABO System

The major alloantigen system in humans, which is based on 3 carbohydrate antigens expressed on red cells, encoded on chromosome 9q34. 
Significance ABO blood groups determine to whom one can donate blood from whom one can accept blood. Type A or AB blood causes an immune reaction in type Bs. Type B and AB blood cause an immune reaction in type As. Conversely, type O blood has no A or B antigens—type Os are universal donors. Since AB blood already produces both antigens, type ABs can accept any of the other blood types without suffering an immune reaction, and are thus known as universal recipients, as they form antibodies to neither A nor B antigens.

ABO system

ABO blood group system Transfusion medicine The major alloantigen system in humans, based on 3 carbohydrate antigens expressed on RBCs, encoded on chromosome 9q34 Significance ABO blood groups determine who can donate blood to, or accept blood from, whom; type A or AB blood causes an immune reaction in type Bs; type B and AB blood cause an immune reaction in type As; conversely, type O blood has no A or B antigens–type Os are universal donors; since AB blood already produces both antigens, type ABs can accept any of the other blood types without suffering an immune reaction, and are thus known as universal recipients, as he/she forms antibodies to neither A nor B antigens. See Blood group antigens, Lewis antigen, Transplantation, Universal donor, Universal recipient.
References in periodicals archive ?
ABO blood group system and placental malaria in an area of unstable malaria transmission in eastern Sudan.
in molecular genetics of the ABO blood group system from Lund University where he is an Associate Professor at the Institute of Laboratory Medicine, Lund University.