A Level

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A Level

A qualification offered by (pre-university) educational institutions in the UK (except Scotland, where they are called Highers). A-levels (usually a set of three, often closely-related subjects—e.g., Mathematics, Physics and Chemistry) are studied over a two-year period. The first year is called AS (Advanced Subsidiary), a period in which students often take four, then drop to three for the second year, A2. A levels constitute the standard entry qualification for academic courses in English, Welsh and Northern Irish universities. A levels help students prepare for material to study at university.
References in periodicals archive ?
The A-level pass rate has been rising for 26 years in a row.
The changes meant sixth-formers could do four easier AS-level units and only two of the harder A2 modules and still get a full A-level. Other subjects required three of each.
The regulator pointed out that most AS-level entries are by 17-year-olds, whereas most A-level entries are by 18-yearolds and according to both the ONS and Welsh Government statistics, these age groups have decreased in size since 2015.
It comes after the last A-Level provider in the borough, Halewood Academy, said its sixth form had become unsustainable and unaffordable last year.
Ofqual said yesterday that it had "identified significant shifts in exam boards' grade boundaries in reformed A-level maths between 2018 and 2019", adding, "while some fluctuation in boundaries is not uncommon, we considered these particular changes to be more unusual".
Your A-Level results will be revealed by your college, school or educational establishment.
In some cases, schools and colleges allow pupils with low GCSE attainment take AS and A-level courses in order to get funding rather than because it is in their best interests to do them, the report adds.
The King Henry VIII School pupil picked up some amazing results at A-level and is now set to move to the US to attend university on a golfing scholarship.
THERE were jubilant scenes at Newcastle High School for Girls (NHSG) as it once again celebrated a fabulous set of A-level results.
MORE than half a million students in Wales, England and Northern Ireland are receiving A-level results today.
STUDENTS taking Maths and Further Maths at A-level are the most likely to come out with top grades, new figures show.