A-HeFT

A-HeFT

African-American heart failure trial. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 1,100 African-American men and women with moderate to severe congestive heart failure, categorised as New York Heart Association (NYHA) heart failure classifications III and IV. A-HeFT assessed the effects of an NO-enhancing drug, isosorbide dinatrate (BiDil). The trial was stopped early because of marked improvement in Black patients in whom it reduced mortality by 43% and hospitalisations by 39%. Isosorbide became the first heart-failure medication to specifically address endothelial dysfunction, and is the first race-based prescription drug.
References in periodicals archive ?
After the publication of African American Heart Failure (A-HeFT) trial, there was a significant increase in the amount of hydralazine prescribed to patients with heart failure.
(8) As a result, another set of trials (called A-HeFT) was undertaken to assess the drug efficacy in 1,050 self-reported African-American subjects.
A study comparing the formulations of isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) and hydralazine (HYD) used in V-HeFT I and V-HeFT II, and BiDil, the proprietary fixed dose combination, used in the African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) demonstrated no bioequivalence.
This may be because the drug combination possesses the remarkable property of exerting differential effects on blood pressure depending on a patient's baseline blood pressure, according to a new secondary analysis of the African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT).
In the African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT), the drug combination (BiDil, Nitromed Inc.) was associated with an increase in survival of 43% for African Americans with moderate to severe heart failure (N.
"The A-Heft trial showed the medication to be effective in treating severe heart failure.
Those outcomes were evaluated in the African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT), which compared the combination with placebo in self-identified African American patients with moderate to severe heart failure (HF) who were on standard HF treatments, and which was the basis for the approval.
The FDA reports the approval of BiDil was based in part on the results of the African-American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT).
(27) Frequently Asked Questions About The A-Heft Trial Background For Abc Members.
Primary end points of the African Americans Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) were death, first hospitalization for heart failure, and change in quality of life (N.
The African-American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT) showed that nitrates and hydralazine improved mortality when used with ACE inhibitors and [beta]-blockers, but their value when added to traditional therapy is unknown in other racial groups.
Those three outcomes were evaluated in the African American Heart Failure Trial (A-HeFT), which compared the combination with placebo in self-identified African American patients with moderate to severe heart failure (HE) who were on standard HF treatments and was the basis for this approval.