A-HeFT

A-HeFT

African-American heart failure trial. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 1,100 African-American men and women with moderate to severe congestive heart failure, categorised as New York Heart Association (NYHA) heart failure classifications III and IV. A-HeFT assessed the effects of an NO-enhancing drug, isosorbide dinatrate (BiDil). The trial was stopped early because of marked improvement in Black patients in whom it reduced mortality by 43% and hospitalisations by 39%. Isosorbide became the first heart-failure medication to specifically address endothelial dysfunction, and is the first race-based prescription drug.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the A-HeFT clinical trial appeared to be a success--indeed, it led to the 2005 FDA approval of BiDil as a drug for a specific racially defined population (10)--many commentators felt there were serious weaknesses with the research.
Two large heart failure studies using two distinct formulations showed different results in decreasing mortality, only BiDil has shown significant reductions in death and hospitalization in black heart failure patients, as seen in A-HeFT.
These A-HeFT data show isosorbide dinitrate-hydralazine (BiDil) lowered blood pressure only in patients with normal or elevated baseline systolic blood pressure.
The magnitude of this finding surprised some because the A-HeFT patients were already aggressively treated for heart failure: 87% were already taking [beta]-blockers, 78% were on ACE inhibitors, 39% were on aldosterone inhibitors, and 28% were taking angiotensin receptor blockers.
The A-Heft trial showed the medication to be effective in treating severe heart failure.
A-HeFT compared BiDil with placebo in black men and women with moderate to severe HF who were on standard HF therapies, including ACE inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, aldosterone antagonists, as well as digitalis and diuretics.
27) Frequently Asked Questions About The A-Heft Trial Background For Abc Members.
Food and Drug Administration, primarily on the basis of efficacy data from NitroMed's landmark A-HeFT (African American Heart Failure Trial) clinical trial.
80 per tablet, the average prescribed dose, and compliance data from the A-HeFT.