714-X


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714-X

Pseudomedicine
An unproven method for cancer management developed by Gaston Naessens in Montreal in the early 1970s, which entailed intralymphatic injections of nitrogen-rich camphor and organic salts.
714-X therapy is based on Naessens’ observation that cancer cells require and consume abundant nitrogen, allegedly excreting a substance he calls “co-carcinogenic K factor,” which allegedly paralyses the immune system. Per Naessens, the nitrogen-rich camphor provides the cancer cells with the required nitrogen, causing them to stop excreting co-carcinogenic K factor, resulting in an upregulation of immune defences. It has been dismissed by mainstream doctors and researchers as completely ineffective.
References in periodicals archive ?
* The camphor derivative 714-X, licensed in Canada, has been popularized as a cancer treatment because of media reports on long-term remissions and "cures."
Termed 714-X, the compound was a derivative of camphor with an additional nitrogen molecule.
714-X was designed to interfere with the metabolism of cancer cells.
He was charged with negligent homicide in the death of a woman with advanced breast cancer who had undergone treatment with 714-X; he was also charged with 64 counts of practicing medicine without a license.
Subsequently Health and Welfare Canada began to permit distribution of 714-X.
While 714-X is not licensed for use in the United States, it can be obtained for personal use from the Canadian manufacturer.
* The camphor derivative 714-X, licensed in Canada, has been popularized as a cancer therapy via media reports on long-term remissions and "cures."
Health and Welfare Canada later began to permit distribution of 714-X. More than 800 physicians in Canada reportedly prescribe the drug.
Although 714-X is not licensed for use in the United States, it can be obtained for personal use from the Canadian manufacturer.
Testimonials about 714-X helped lead to the establishment of the National Institutes of Health's National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.
There have been no clinical trials of the efficacy of 714-X; only case reports have been published.
In May 2001, prompted by the Dana-Farber Cancer Center in Boston, where some highly controversial testing of the drug had been done, the National Cancer Institute initiated efforts to scientifically evaluate 714-X. In August 2001, the manufacturer (Cerbe Distribution Inc., Rock Forest, Que.) submitted to the NCI's Office of Cancer Complementary and Alternative Medicine 16 case studies in which patients were treated successfully with the drug.