5-alpha reductase inhibitor

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5-alpha reductase inhibitor

A medication to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia. It blocks the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone.
See also: inhibitor
References in periodicals archive ?
The men were randomly given a fixed combination of saw palmetto extract and stinging nettle root or the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor Proscar (finasteride).
The decrease in PSA in the Se-SM group shows that prophylaxis due to the Se-SM combination may be as effective as 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor treatment (Tindall and Rittmaster, 2008).
Exclusion criteria included a history of invasive BPH treatment, recent treatment with either an alpha-blocker or a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor; recent phytotherapy, including saw palmetto; and a history of prostate or bladder cancer.
Clinical usefulness of serum prostate specific antigen for the detection of prostate cancer is preserved in men receiving the dual 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor dutasteride.
Treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia with 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor: morphological changes in patients who fail to respond.
At the time of presentation, his medications included a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor (dutasteride) and his anti-Parkinsonian medications (levodopa and the dopamine agonist pramipexole).
Approximately half were randomly assigned to take the 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride and half to take placebo for 7 years.
The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial prospectively evaluated finasteride, a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, as chemoprevention.
Just last year, some researchers in the United States said that their reevaluation of the research didn't come to the same conclusions, and wrote that all men should take a patent medicine 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor to reduce their risk of prostate cancer.
Many of us will reach for an alpha-adrenergic antagonist or a 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor as first-line therapy for patients with mild but annoying symptoms.
Dutasteride and finasteride, another 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor, were shot down as prostate chemoprevention agents in December 2010 by the FDA's Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee on the basis that the risk-benefit profile for either drug is not favorable when it is used to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.
A team led by Edinburgh University and University College London studied about 55,000 men in the UK, who had been prescribed 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors over an 11-year period.

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