stereoscopy

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ster·e·os·co·py

(ster'ē-os'kŏ-pē),
1. An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.
2.

stereoscopy

(stĕr′ē-ŏs′kə-pē, stîr′-)
n.
An optical technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

ster·e·os·co·py

(ster'ē-os'kŏ-pē)
An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

stereoscopy 

The science dealing with the perception of three-dimensional effects and of producing them. See stereopsis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Kaura elaborated: "Our radiologists and technicians are trained on how to convert CT or MRI scans into 3D images.This is a manual process and requires expert skills to highlight the areas that will eventually be printed into a 3D model."
A 3D image is given by an [n.sub.1] x [n.sub.2] x [n.sub.3] array I = [[I.sub.ijk]} with indices (i, j, k) [[1, [n.sub.1]]] x [[1, [n.sub.2]]] x [[1, [n.sub.3]]].
Isley: It would help if clinical data existed showing instances where 3D images were used to treat a patient either during or after surgery and proved more effective than a 2D image.
WhaZop [TM] specializes in custom designing 3D image icons, recognizable to consumers also featuring online mobile content, social media interaction and e-commerce.
The serial optical sections of the crypt organoids showed well-delineated images, which could be reconstructed into a 3D image, and the spatial relationship between the labeled cells and surrounding tissues could be identified.
We now have our own cameraman but have also perfected a means of building 3D images from photographs or digital images which customers e-mail to us.
He said: "We have our own cameraman but have also perfected a means of building 3D images from photographs or digital images."
It can take up to 72 hours to scan a single weapon, and officials then have to send the data to laboratories in Los Alamos, N.M., or Livermore, where scientists compile the information into 3D images, Hodges says.
The 3D images are incredibly detailed, especially given the size of the beastie.
A new software package for the portable unit, Faro Scene 3.0, allows the resulting image to resemble a black and white photograph, but unlike a static, 2D photographic image, the software creates a 3D image. In addition to permitting the measurement of points in space, it also allows "moving" through the image.
The significant increase in computing power in recent years has allowed the development of powerful new 3D image analysis and visualization algorithms that promise to change the way medicine is practiced.