30-day mortality

30-day mortality

A statistic defined as death occurring within 30 days of a defined event—e.g., hospital admission, diagnosis of an infection, surgery.

30-day mortality

Epidemiology A statistic defined as death occurring within 30 days of a hospital admission
References in periodicals archive ?
However, when considering LOS as a predictor (independent variable), we modelled it as a categorical variable (0 to 2, 3 to 5, 6 to 8, [greater than or equal to] 9 days) because we did not expect the LOS to be associated with 30-day readmission and 30-day mortality in a solely linear manner (e.g., higher LOS with increased odds of 30-day readmission).
Among adults who present to the emergency department with acute heart failure, blood glucose levels may predict 30-day mortality, regardless of whether or not the patients have preexisting diabetes.
The study also demonstrated a trend towards reduction in 30-day mortality by nearly 6%.
The impact of hospital nursing characteristics on 30-day mortality. Nursing Research, 54(2), 72-84.
In a study from Taiwan, adjusted odds of 30-day mortality for patients undergoing PCI at medium-volume hospitals (200-399 cases/year) was not significantly different from those of patients treated at high-volume hospitals (>400 cases/year).
In-hospital mortality rates dropped almost four percent in this time period, while the 30-day mortality rate for all other conditions dropped only .04 percent.
The five proposed measures include 30-day mortality for Medicare patients with pneumonia, and four additional measures relating to surgical care improvement.
The effect of prior statin use on 30-day mortality among patients hospitalised with community acquired pneumonia has also been studied (12).
Patients in class I have the lowest pneumonia severity and class Vs have a 30-day mortality of 27.0%.
NEW ORLEANS -- An elevated fasting glucose in nondiabetic patients with acute myocardial infarction is a powerful predictor of increased 30-day mortality, Dr.
For 30-day mortality, the corresponding hazard ratios were 1.7 and 2.4 for yellow patients; 2.6 and 7.6 for orange patients; and 19.1 and 27.1 for red patients.