stereoscopy

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ster·e·os·co·py

(ster'ē-os'kŏ-pē),
1. An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.
2.

stereoscopy

(stĕr′ē-ŏs′kə-pē, stîr′-)
n.
An optical technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

ster·e·os·co·py

(ster'ē-os'kŏ-pē)
An optic technique by which two images of the same object are blended into one, giving a three-dimensional appearance to the single image.

stereoscopy 

The science dealing with the perception of three-dimensional effects and of producing them. See stereopsis.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mahmoud resorted to older 3-D technology compatible with the affordable 3-D glasses and available projectors: 350 Red/Cyan 3-D glasses from 3-Dglassesonline.com costing LE 1,000 were shipped to Egypt for the first time.
Fowler did not wear her 3-D glasses over her eyeglasses during the film ("It's too weird," she said), General Manager James J.
Two sets of 3-D glasses will be enclosed in each package for players to experience visuals that seem to pop out from their television sets.
Armed with a pair of hitech, polarized 3-D glasses, cinemagoers will be able to get up close and personal with an exciting range of 3-D releases set to burst on to screens during the year.
Technology from Intel helped animate the trailer, and the company has produced more than 125 million pairs of 3-D glasses, which are being distributed by PepsiCo though 25,000 SoBe Life Water displays in grocery stores, drug stores, and other retail venues.
* Horizontal double-density pixel (HDDP) structure, a proprietary pixel array for stereoscopic displays, that enables users to view high-density stereoscopic images without special 3-D glasses.
The Siemens SXD3 1899 is an 18-inch 3-D flat panel screen that three-dimensional without the need for special viewing aids 3-D glasses or shutters.
I've only seen what it will look like on a computer screen without 3-D glasses so I haven't had the full visual experience.
Put on a pair of 3-D glasses and check out this latest snapshot of the sun!
Paired images seem to pop out of the screen when viewed with the 3-D glasses.
The newer method of screening 3-D films doesn't require the use of two projectors, and the lenses of the polarized 3-D glasses are clear instead of red and blue.