three-dimensional

(redirected from 3-D)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

three-dimensional

, 3D
Of or pert. to three dimensions.

three-dimensional 

Pertaining to depth perception or the illusion of depth (e.g. a perspective drawing).
References in periodicals archive ?
According to this view, Sharits engages less in the dry axioms of structural film than in orchestrating embodied encounters with light and motion that, in Osterweil's words, "convulse the spectator into a heightened awareness of physiological and filmic sensation." (6) The use of 3-D can be seen as very much in line with this larger project: In addition to its haptic effect, it invokes the heritage of the stereoscope, a device that art historian Jonathan Crary sees as emblematic of the nineteenth-century shift to a new conception of vision as unreliable and corporeal and as signaling a move away from perspectival organization toward tactile space--issues of great importance across Sharits's body of work.
Media Contact: Bob Furmanek, director, 3-D Film Archive.
Undeen says that the use of 3-D printing gives visitors a new way of viewing the museum's collection.
Exact figures of 3-D releases are difficult to determine, especially since some films are released in 3-D internationally but not in the US (e.g., Noah [2014]), but by 2011, over 50 American films were being released theatrically in 3-D.
"I like to make things kind of like you would see, or would like to see in the wild," said Scott Anstine, the club's 3-D coordinator, who set up the targets for the fun shoot.
Katharina Loew's article, "Tangible Specters: 3-D Cinema in the 1910s," provides a fascinating historical analysis of "Pepper's Ghost," the pseudo-binocular process for producing 3-D effects in the absence of a visible screen.
Furthermore, IHS predicts a major price drop on all 3-D TV sets.
Manufacturers including Sony are making 3-D televisions, while broadcasters such as Sky have launched 3-D television channels.
Movies available in both two- and three-dimensional projection often derive two-thirds or more of their revenue from 3-D versions, with fans willing to pay the few dollars extra it costs to put on the dorky glasses that bring the illusion of depth to the images.
A ton of TVs labeled as "3-D capable" are on the market, including a number of models available in stores across Latin America, and more manufacturers are expected to jump onboard.
Competition in the market for PCs that can display three-dimensional images is expected to heat up in the wake of renewed interest triggered by blockbuster 3-D movies such as ''Avatar,'' which have sent electronics makers like Toshiba Corp.