Bluetooth

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Bluetooth

A royalty-free technology that is a de facto standard in wireless telecom, which allows a wide range of appliances to eliminate cables and replace them with wireless low-frequency radio connections.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the reference antenna, the realized gain at 2.4 GHz band is approximately -10 dBi at both 0.3 mm and 0.6 mm distance from the body.
An insertion loss of 14 dB has been recorded in the 2.4 GHz band increasing to 23 dB at the 5.5 GHz band.
802.11b devices suffer interference from other products operating in the 2.4 GHz band. Devices operating in the 2.4 GHz range include: microwave ovens, Bluetooth devices, baby monitors, and cordless telephones.
Bluetooth: A short-range wireless communications technology that uses the 2.4 GHz band to link mobile information terminals over short distances of about several meters.
* The DR9011/DR9021 point-to-point system with a choice of 3 radio frequencies; 2 in the 915 MHz ISM band and 1 in the 2.4 GHz band.
VDC forecasts that in 2012 the largest worldwide shipment share will be for products using the IEEE 802.11g standard, followed by those using proprietary protocols operating in the 2.4 GHz band.
It uses a proprietary protocol and runs in the 2.4 GHz band using DSSS (direct-sequence spread spectrum) and frequency agility.
802.11b is an extension of 802.11 that applies to wireless LANS and provides 11 Mbps transmission in the 2.4 GHz band.
The product provides fixed and mobile broadband access to users in the unlicensed 2.4 GHz band, as well as in the new licensed 4.9 GHz public safety band.
Yamamoto, et al., "A 2.4 GHz Band, 1.8 V Operation Single-chip Si-CMOS T/R-MMIC Front-end with a Low Insertion Loss Switch," IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits, Vol.
Operating at 2.4 GHz band, IEEE 802.11g is an established wireless networking standard that eliminates the need for the wires that frequently connect computers.
Because both Bluetooth and the 802.11 b and 802.11g standards use the crowded 2.4 GHz band, there is the possibility for interference.