lactic acid

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lactic

 [lak´tik]
pertaining to milk.
lactic acid a metabolic intermediate involved in many biochemical processes; it is the end product of glycolysis, which provides energy anaerobically in skeletal muscle during heavy exercise, and it can be oxidized aerobically in the heart for energy production or can be converted back to glucose (gluconeogenesis) in the liver. Moderate elevations of blood lactate occur during heavy exercise; severe elevations (lactic acidosis) can occur in diabetes mellitus and in genetic deficiencies of enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis. Lactate is also the end product of fermentation in several bacterial species. The sodium salt of racemic or inactive lactic acid (sodium lactate) is used as an electrolyte and fluid replenisher.

lac·tic ac·id

(lak'tik as'id),
A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. In pure form, a syrupy, odorless, and colorless liquid obtained by the action of the lactic acid bacillus on milk or milk sugar; in concentrated form, a caustic used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. A culture of the bacillus, or milk containing it, is usually given in place of the acid. l-Lactic acid is also known as sarcolactic acid.

lactic acid

n.
A syrupy, water-soluble liquid, C3H6O3, produced by anaerobic glucose metabolism in muscles, by certain bacteria, and by synthetic methods. Lactic acid is present in fermented foods such as yogurt and sauerkraut and is used in foods and beverages as a flavoring and preservative, in dyeing and textile printing, and in pharmaceuticals.

lac·tic ac·id

(lak'tik as'id)
A normal intermediate in glycosis.

lactic acid

An acid formed when muscles are strongly contracted for long periods. Also formed from carbohydrates in the vagina by the action of DODERLEIN'S BACILLUS. Lactic acid is an ingredient in a range of drug formulations.

lactic acid

an organic acid (CH3 CH(OH)COOH) produced from pyruvic acid as a result of ANAEROBIC RESPIRATION in microorganisms (see LACTOSE and in the active muscles of animals (see OXYGEN DEBT), the hydrogenation of pyruvate being catalysed by lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). In animals the acid can be oxidized back to pyruvate (using LDH again) when sufficient oxygen is available, most of the conversion taking place in the liver.

lac·tic ac·id

(lak'tik as'id)
Normal intermediate in the fermentation of sugar. In concentrated form, a caustic used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation.
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