Rehabilitation Act

(redirected from 1973 Rehabilitation Act)
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Rehabilitation Act

An act passed by the US Congress in 1973 which prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in programs conducted by Federal agencies, in programs receiving Federal financial assistance, in Federal employment, and in the employment practices of Federal contractors.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1973 Rehabilitation Act changed the face of speech technology in education, as it required all universities receiving federal funds to make accommodations for students with disabilities," says Eric Shellef, cofounder and chief technology officer of Verbit.ai, a large-scale transcription and captioning solution.
Much of the progress in recent decades was spurred by three important pieces of legislation: the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, and the 1990 Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA).
Much of the progress made in recent decades was spurred by three important pieces of legislation: the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968, the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, and the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act.
Section 508 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act requires that electronic and information technology bought by the federal government must be accessible to people with disabilities.
If they have a zero tolerance for harassment on the basis of race and gender, but "look the other way" when it comes to disability harassment, then they are violating the Americans with Disabilities Act (Title 2) and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Schools MUST comply with both laws (even though many will try to tell you they don't have to).
More recently, findings of Section 21 of the 1992 Amendments to the 1973 Rehabilitation Act address continued problems in the vocational rehabilitation system:
Events that occurred during the 1970's, particularly the emphasis on severe disability that characterized the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, provided additional impetus for improved services for traditionally underserved persons who are deaf.
Guided by the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, a precursor to the A.D.A., the Carter Administration issued rules requiring lifts on buses, but the transit industry has tenaciously argued against these rules in court.
The 1973 Rehabilitation Act represented a major overhaul of rehabilitation legislation in response to changing social trends, especially a growing consumer movement.
Since these private medical clinics receive federal funds, however, they must provide "program access" to their services under legal interpretations of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Program access can be achieved through architectural modification, operational adjustments, or a combination.
In the U.S., various pieces of legislation, including the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and the 1992 Reauthorization of the Rehabilitation Act, have set the stage for the rehabilitation community to include the issue of full integration of individuals with disabilities within the framework of rehabilitation.
The law provides that transit authorities failing to implement the Act's requirements may considered to have discriminated against people with disabilities and may be sued under Sections 504 and 505 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act, which provide for injunctive relief.