yellow calf

yellow calf

see copper nutritional deficiency.
References in classic literature ?
Katharine had to go to the bookcase and choose a portly volume in sleek, yellow calf, which had directly a sedative effect upon both her parents.
I saw Voltaire in red morocco, Shakespeare in blue, Walter Scott in green, the "History of England" in brown, the "Annual Register" in yellow calf.
Virgil's encounters with Yellow Calf (Saginaw Grant) are deeply moving.
As Yellow Calf tells him, "Sometimes you have to lean into the wind to stand straight.
Already identifying as the son of First Raise, he "discovers" through "that feeling of event" an experience that allows him also to identify as the grandson of Yellow Calf.
Owens responds that the narrator not only can plan a future but can also come to understand himself better by imagining himself a confident Blackfeet man connected to his ancestral past, culture, and lands, "living to the best of his ability," as Yellow Calf says.
Sylvester Yellow Calf has had it made all his life: basketball star, respected and able lawyer, tall and handsome and sensitive.
In one scene Yellow Calf goes home to his Blackfeet reservation--Welch is Blackfeet and Gros Ventre--at Browning, situated near the gorgeous Glacier National Park near the Canadian border.
Yellow Calf's character is elusive, his stories are evasive, but as the narrator listens he discovers that the sightless hermit Yellow Calf is anything but blind.
In The Indian Lawyer, Welch moves to the 1980s where he depicts Sylvester Yellow Calf struggling to understand himself in an urban world of mainstream politics and culture.
For example, at a particularly telling point in The Indian Lawyer, Sylvester Yellow Calf, the book's protagonist, reflects that, "He had nightmares of waking up in the street, stark naked, alone in a crowd of strangers, not knowing where he was or what had happened, alone and naked and full of loathing of himself, his father, the strangers - and his mother"(1) The passage illustrates the importance of the insider/outsider conflict in the book as well as echoing almost directly David Riesman's study, The Lonely Crowd
Although Winter in the Blood (1974) concludes with an epilogue, the epiphany occurs nearly twenty pages earlier, when the unnamed first-person narrator recognizes that blind, old Yellow Calf is his grandfather, an event heralded by the comical farting of Bird, his horse.