year

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year

(yēr),
An approximately 365-day period, the time the earth takes to revolve around the sun.
[O.E. gēar ]
References in classic literature ?
The old year is going away beautifully," said Anne.
A few years later that French force became overwhelming, for in 1066 William of Normandy came to our shores, and with his coming it seemed for a time as if the life of English literature was to be crushed out forever.
And right here something happened to me, the gravity of which I never dreamed for many a long year to come.
His keen grey eyes were undimmed, and the only lines upon his face were the lines of iron character and determination that always had been there since first I remembered him, nearly thirty-five years before.
He shall hold his Office during the Term of four Years, and, together with the Vice President chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows:
Several years later he established a shipbuilding plant near Boston, which grew until it employed four thousand workmen and had built half a dozen warships for the United States Navy.
She had barely turned thirteen years, Poe himself was but twentysix.
Five years more passed, dating from the day when the deserted wife was laid in her grave.
It is these same elements, together with the vigorous presentation and emphasis of basal practical virtues, that distinguished 'Robinson Crusoe,' of which the First Part appeared in 1719, when Defoe was nearly or quite sixty years of age.
was continued throughout his whole reign, a period of about thirty-five years.
For seven years afterwards he remained, at the strong intercession of his friends, comparatively quiet; saving that he, every now and then, took occasion to display his zeal for the Protestant faith in some extravagant proceeding which was the delight of its enemies; and saving, besides, that he was formally excommunicated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, for refusing to appear as a witness in the Ecclesiastical Court when cited for that purpose.
Look at my sword, a Spanish blade, the one I wore at Rochelle; it served me for thirty years without fail; one day in the winter it fell upon the marble floor on the Louvre and was broken.