yard

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yard

(yard)
A measure of 3 ft or 36 in.; equal to 0.9144 m.

yard

1. a unit of linear measure, 3 feet, or 36 inches, equivalent to 86.44 cm. See also Table 4.5.
2. a small fenced enclosure called also corral.
3. in the UK is synonymous with feedlot.
4. to enclose animals in a small enclosure.
References in classic literature ?
I went on one side about two hundred yards, and beckoning to her not to look or to follow me, I hid myself between two leaves of sorrel, and there discharged the necessities of nature.
The solitary bull stood fifty yards or so to this side of the herd, over which he was evidently keeping sentry, and about sixty yards from us.
Eh, my child, he won't know anything about it," said Silas; "gentlefolks didn't ever go up the Yard.
Then to the yard with the whole of them," said the curate; "for to have the burning of Queen Pintiquiniestra, and the shepherd Darinel and his eclogues, and the bedevilled and involved discourses of his author, I would burn with them the father who begot me if he were going about in the guise of a knight-errant.
It was nearly four hours since Raffles had stolen away from my side in the ominous precincts of Scotland Yard.
Inspector Jacks did not at once return to Scotland Yard.
a high-pitched voice shouted, and a seven-year-old boy in a black sheepskin coat, new white felt boots, and a warm cap, ran hurriedly out of the house into the yard.
At the end of the yard a dark mass, tinted with a dingy blue by the morning dawn, rose before him, its dark outlines standing out in contrast to the houses already illuminated by the pale light of early morning.
Fentolin remarked, "but is it really true that you have had enquiries from Scotland Yard about the poor fellow up-stairs?
After looking round the parlor, Levin went out in the back yard.
By and bye, he saw, as he looked from his grated window, a strange glimmering on the stone walls and pavement of the yard.
In London itself, though in the old rustic road towards a suburb of note where in the days of William Shakespeare, author and stage- player, there were Royal hunting-seats--howbeit no sport is left there now but for hunters of men--Bleeding Heart Yard was to be found; a place much changed in feature and in fortune, yet with some relish of ancient greatness about it.