xanthelasma


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xanthelasma

 [zan″thĕ-laz´mah]
xanthoma affecting the eyelids and characterized by soft yellowish spots or plaques.

xan·the·las·ma pal·pe·bra·rum

soft, yellow-orange plaques on the eyelids or medial canthus, the most common form of xanthoma; may be associated with low-density lipoproteins, especially in younger adults.

xanthelasma

/xan·thel·as·ma/ (zan″thĕ-laz´mah) planar xanthoma affecting the eyelids.

xanthelasma

[zan′thəlaz′mə]
Etymology: Gk, xanthos, yellow + Gk, elasma, plate
a planar xanthoma involving the eyelid(s). Also called xanthoma palpebrarum.
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Xanthelasma

xanthelasma

Fatty skin growth Dermatology A condition characterized by multiple 1-2 mm yellowish plaques–lipid-laden histiocytes surrounding blood vessels, formally, xanthomas of the inner eyelid, commonly seen in normocholesterolemic elderly, or hypercholesterolemic younger persons. See Xanthoma.

xan·the·las·ma pal·pe·bra·rum

(zanthĕ-lazmă palpē-brārŭm)
Soft, yellow-orange plaques on the eyelids or medial canthus, the most common form of xanthoma; may be associated with elevation of low-density lipoproteins, especially in younger adults.
Synonym(s): xanthelasma.

xanthelasma

(zan″thĕ-laz′mă) [ xantho- + Gr. elasma, (metal) plate]
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XANTHELASMA
A xanthoma on the eyelids, esp. near the inner canthus. See: illustration

xanthelasma

Cholesterol deposits in the eyelid skin, near the inner corner of the eye, appearing as unsightly, raised, yellow plaques that enlarge slowly. Xanthelasma does not necessarily imply raised blood cholesterol, but this should be checked to eliminate the dangerous condition of familial hypercholesterolaemia, of which it is a feature. Plaques of xanthelasma can easily be removed but tend to recur.

xanthelasma 

A cutaneous deposition of lipid material that appears in the skin of the eyelids, most commonly near the inner canthi. It appears as a yellowish, slightly elevated area. It is a benign and chronic condition that occurs primarily in the elderly. It may be associated with raised blood cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein and triglyceride levels, leading to heart disease or diabetes. Syn. xanthoma; xanthelasma palpebrarum; xanthoma palpebrarum. See corneal arcus; Hollenhorst's plaque.
References in periodicals archive ?
The review concluded that "sufficient evidence is available to suggest laser therapies to be a cosmetically excellent treatment option for xanthelasma, particularly applicable in patients who are not good candidates for surgical excision," he said.
13) If you note tendon xanthomas, xanthelasmas, or arcus corneae while examining any of your patients, be sure to order an LDL level if it hasn't already been done.
Regarding cutaneous manifestations, multiple types of xanthomas can occur in familial hypercholesterolaemia, such as tendinous, tuberous, subperiosteal, and xanthelasma.
Referral letters accompanying patients almost invariably commented on xanthelasma, but seldom on arcus cornealis and practically never on tendon xanthomata.
Twelve patients in the study were found to have xanthelasma palpebrarum (4.
60 Lipoprotein(a) (mg/L) 50 59 Xanthoma No Xanthelasma Apo E genotype [member of]3 [member of]3 [member of]3 [member of]3 LDL receptor Stul Ala/Ala Ala/Ala (a) Reference ranges for the plasma lipids and abbreviations are as shown in Table 1.
Dermatological manifestations due to metabolic condition were xanthelasma palpebrerum, seen in 2 patients (2%).
Xanthelasma, which are entirely harmless but they contain cholesterol, suggesting your blood cholesterol could be high.
Xanthoma and xanthelasma can be seen in one third of patients.
Other changes seen were oral lesions seen in 46% cases, yellowish discoloration of skin seen in 40% cases, pruritis seen in 45% cases, striae distensae seen in 36% cases, Taenia infection was seen in 29% cases, Petechiae, ecchymosis and bruising were seen in 19% cases, urticaria was seen in 18% cases, Xanthelasma was seen in 8% cases, dermatitis was seen in 7% cases and vitiligo, dupuytren's contracture and spider naevi were seen in 3% cases each.
Retrospectively we analysed the lipid profile of the patient which was found to be normal, however, we could find a xanthelasma lesion over left upper eyelid (Fig 6).