wound contracture


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Related to wound contracture: granulation tissue, re-epithelialization, wound contraction

wound contracture

wound size reduction during proliferative phase of wound healing (Table 1) due to action of fibroblast activity
Table 1: Phases in the progression of an ulcer to healing
Ulcer phaseCharacteristicsComment
Active phaseWound dimensions increase (undermined wound edges)
Exudation
Formation of slough
Periwound oedema and induration of edges
Dissolution and degradation of devitalized tissue ± infection
Macrophage and enzyme activity
Accumulation of degraded tissue and dead macrophages
Chronic, non-resolving inflammation ± collagen deposition
Proliferative phaseWound begins to infill (wound dimensions reduce)
Epithelialization (saucerization) of margins
Formation of granulation tissue
Recruitment of fibroblasts; collagen formation
Epidermal cells at margins mitose and spread out to begin to close wound
Maturation phaseWound contraction
Wound closure
Scar formation
Myofibrils within fibroblasts contract
Epithelialization is complete
Devascularization of fibrotic tissue that forms scar

wound contracture

scar tissue contraction, especially marked after burn injury

wound

a bodily injury caused by physical means, with disruption of the normal continuity of structures.

avulsive wound
blowing wound
open pneumothorax.
wound contracture
contused wound
one in which the skin is unbroken.
wound débridement
wound dehiscence
wound drain
any device by which a channel or open area may be established for the exit of material from a wound or cavity. See also drain, drainage, wound healing (below).
wound healing
the restoration of integrity to injured tissues by replacement of dead tissue with viable tissue. The process starts immediately after an injury and may continue for months or years, and is essentially the same for all types of wounds. Variations in wound healing are the result of differences in location, severity of the wound, and the extent of injury to the tissues. Other factors affecting wound healing are the age, nutritional status and general state of health of the animal and its body reserves and resources for the regeneration of tissue.
In healing by first intention (primary union), restoration of tissue continuity occurs directly, without granulation; in healing by second intention (secondary union), wound repair following tissue loss (as in ulceration or an open wound), is accomplished by closure of the wound with granulation tissue. This tissue is formed by proliferation of fibroblasts and extensive capillary budding at the outer edges and base of the wound cavity. Healing by third intention (delayed primary closure) occurs when a wound is initially too contaminated to close and is closed surgically 4 or 5 days after the injury.
The insertion of drains can facilitate healing by providing an outlet for removing accumulations of serosanguineous fluid and purulent material, and obliterating dead space.
wound healing agents
topical agents which stimulate healing; includes preparations containing zinc, trypsin, neomycin, dyes and iodine.
incised wound
one caused by a cutting instrument.
lacerated wound
one in which the tissues are torn.
wound nonhealing
failure to heal despite appropriate treatment being given.
open wound
one that communicates directly with the atmosphere.
penetrating wound
one caused by a sharp, usually slender object, which passes through the skin into the underlying tissues.
perforating wound
a penetrating wound which extends into a viscus or bodily cavity.
pocket wound
chronic, nonhealing wound in which there is granulation tissue but the overlying skin does not adhere. Seen most commonly in the axillae or groin of cats.
puncture wound
penetrating wound.
sucking wound
a penetrating wound of the chest through which air is drawn in and out.
surgical wound
one deliberately produced during a surgical procedure, e.g. the original incision.
tangential wound
an oblique, glancing wound which results in one edge being undercut.
traumatopneic wound
sucking wound.