wound botulism


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Related to wound botulism: Infant botulism

botulism

 [boch´u-lizm]
1. any poisoning caused by Clostridium botulinum in the body; it produces a neurotoxin called botulinum toxin.
2. specifically, a rare but severe, often fatal, form of food poisoning due to ingestion of improperly canned or preserved foods contaminated with Clostridium botulinum. Called also foodborne botulism. Symptoms include vomiting, abdominal pain, headache, weakness, constipation, and nerve paralysis (causing difficulty in seeing, breathing, and swallowing), with death from paralysis of the respiratory organs. To prevent botulism, home canning and preserving of all nonacid foods (that is, all foods other than fruits and tomatoes) must be done according to proper specific directions.
Treatment. Treatment is determined based on the type of botulism, but careful respiratory assessment and support are always required. An antitoxin to block the action of toxin circulating in the blood can be used for foodborne and wound botulism if the problem is diagnosed and treated early.
foodborne botulism botulism (def. 2).
infant botulism that affecting infants, typically 4 to 26 weeks of age, marked by constipation, lethargy, hypotonia, and feeding difficulty; it may lead to respiratory insufficiency. It results from toxin produced in the gut by ingested organisms, rather than from preformed toxins.
wound botulism a form resulting from infection of a wound with Clostridium botulinum.

wound bot·u·lism

botulism resulting from infection of a wound.

wound bot·u·lism

(wūnd botyū-lizm)
Poisoning resulting from infection of a wound.

botulism

a highly fatal toxemia caused by the ingestion of toxin produced during vegetative growth of Clostridium botulinum in decomposing animal matter. In agricultural animals, ingestion of preformed toxin most commonly results from contamination during feed preparation or storage allows multiplication of the organism in the feed or allows contamination of feed with carrion containing toxin. In companion animals it occurs as the result of feeding on carrion. The clinical picture includes the development of flaccid paralysis over a period of 1 to 3 days, the animal becoming recumbent and being unable to eat or drink, but being fully conscious. Death is caused by respiratory paralysis. Called also western duck disease, limberneck.

wound botulism
a form resulting from infection of a wound with Clostridium botulinum. Called also toxicoinfectious botulism.
toxicoinfectious botulism
growth and toxin production of the organism in the alimentary tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Botulism in critical care: a case study in wound botulism.
First case of type E wound botulism diagnosed using real-time PCR.
Wound botulism is caused when the spores get into an injection puncture, germinate and release deadly toxin.
Wound botulism connected to injectable drugs first was reported in 1982 in New York City.
To our knowledge, this is the first outbreak of wound botulism in IDUs that was confirmed by molecular epidemiologic typing.
Clinical predictors of respiratory failure and long-term outcome in black tar heroin-associated wound botulism.