workplace violence


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Any act of violence that occurs in a work environment, which may be committed by one worker against another, by outsiders, or by former employees

workplace violence

Occupational medicine Any act of violence that occurs in a work environment, which may be committed by one worker against another, by outsiders, or by former employees. See Postal worker syndrome. Cf Domestic violence.
References in periodicals archive ?
2, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- A new publication by the federal government focusing on preventing workplace violence in health care settings uses case studies from around the country to show best practices, including the successes of unionized registered nurses at Providence Behavioral Health Hospital in Holyoke and Mercy Medical Center in Springfield.
OSHA says that some 2 million workers are victims of some sort of workplace violence each year.
The 25-member Professional Issues Panel on Workplace Violence, Bullying and Incivility is developing a position statement and detailed guidance for registered nurses and employers addressing the dangerous and disruptive behaviors.
This necessitates an assessment into the social skills of administrative and managerial staff and also necessitates facilitating appropriate people skills training; counselling sessions, revision of policies and relocation of staff are seen as the strategies to dealing with the issues of workplace violence within the Dubai Health Authority.
Although OSHA has no standard on workplace violence prevention, Section 5(a)(1) of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 (OSH Act), known as the General Duty Clause, requires employers to provide their employees with a workplace free from recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm.
In recent years, OSHA has aggressively investigated complaints of workplace violence against healthcare workers, typically in emergency departments and mental health departments of hospitals.
During the past decade, health care workers have accounted for two-thirds of the nonfatal workplace violence injuries that lead to days off of work, according to NIOSH.
According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), some two million American workers are victims of workplace violence each year.
Yet the topic of workplace violence in social services has received scant attention within social work and the public health and occupational health literature.
Although the Bureau of Labor Statistics Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries shows that, on average, two people a day die from workplace violence incidents--or about 17 percent of all fatal injuries in the workplace--such deaths rarely are mentioned beyond local media.
In early 2012 OSHA cited a Wisconsin healthcare facility for exposing employees to workplace violence at health care facility and treatment center, a Wisconsin Hospital reported several nurse injuries related to patient violence and personal stories by Wisconsin nurses regardless of work position report increases in violence against nurses in the health care setting.
The Bureau of Labor and Statistics (BLS) data shows the magnitude of workplace violence remains significant.
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