workaholic

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work·a·hol·ic

(werk-ă-hol'ik),
A person who manifests a compulsive need to work, even at the expense of family responsibilities, social life, and health.
[by analogy with alcoholic]

Although increasingly recognized as a source of emotional distress, social malfunctioning, and physical illness, the pathologic need of some people to invest all their energy in goal-directed and intensive labor has not been deeply studied, nor is it named or defined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). The workaholic may engage in physical or mental work or a combination of the two, and may work for an individual or a company, be self-employed, or engage in volunteer activities without remuneration. The typical workaholic seems incapable of relaxing and uses work not only as a source of livelihood but also as a form of recreation, substituting it for leisure pastimes such as socialization, hobbies, sports, and artistic and cultural pursuits. In this sense, work assumes the function of an addictive drug. Workaholics tend to postpone or omit meals, stay at work after others have gone home and even keep working until late at night, put in excessive amounts of overtime (sometimes failing to claim due compensation), and abuse nicotine, caffeine, alcohol, and other agents to assuage stress and withstand fatigue. The workaholic lifestyle is a common feature of various personality disorders, including a compulsion to achieve success, recognition, or advancement in one's chosen field of endeavor; a morbid absorption in the acquisition of wealth; and a need to immerse oneself in work as a distraction from the stresses or dissatisfactions of daily life. Some workaholic behavior is driven by family, social, or cultural expectations. Many workaholics manifest a compulsion to work even in childhood; some seem to be influenced by the example of a successful, driving parent, relative, family friend, or public figure. A workholic mentality may be engendered or fostered by an unduly demanding employer, or by one who makes overtime work either compulsory or highly rewarding as a means of limiting the total work force and thus curtailing the expense of fringe benefits. Long-term health effects of overwork include chronic fatigue, a decline in general health, increased incidence of illnesses and injuries, weight gain, increased use of tobacco and alcohol, deterioration of cognitive performance, emotional lability and depression, and increased mortality. In Japan, death from overwork (karoshi) is formally recognized as a compensable form of occupational disorder. Japanese courts have ruled that deaths from heart failure, stroke, and even suicide are examples of karoshi.

workaholic

(wûr′kə-hô′lĭk, -hŏl′ĭk)
n.
One who has a compulsive and unrelenting need to work.

work′a·hol′ism n.

work·a·hol·ic

(wŏrk'ă-hol'ik)
A person who manifests a compulsive need to work, even at the expense of family responsibilities, social life, and health.
[by analogy with alcoholic]

workaholic

A colloquial term for a person addicted to occupational or productive pursuits who has difficulty relaxing or enjoying familial, social, or leisure activities.
References in periodicals archive ?
An empirical investigation of workaholism in the business setting.
The Relationship between Workaholism, Burnout and Personality: a Literature Review
Furthermore, it has been shown that workaholics do not seem to benefit from social activities after work in the same way as non workaholics do, and that this effect is irrespective of the degree of workaholism, which goes to show that workaholism has a negative influence on wellbeing (Bakker et al.
The researchers used the Bergen Work Addiction Scale to identify workaholism among the subjects, which involved participants rating how often the following statements applied to them in the past year: You think about ways to free up more time for work, You spend significantly more time working than originally planned, You work to reduce feelings of guilt, anxiety, helplessness, or depression, Others have told you to work less but you don't listen to them, You become stressed if you are prevented from working, Work is prioritized before hobbies, leisure activities, and/or exercise, You work to the extent that it negatively impacts your health.
Effective schemes for hindering or handling workaholism should concentrate on setting rational and feasible objectives, improve the workaholic's cognizance that (s)he has a trouble and should clarify it, straightforwardly focus on the immoderate work conduct and concentrating by implication on the repercussions of work dependence, and not be too time-devouring.
2006) the current research focused on workaholism as a negative construct, defining it as an addiction.
Exploring the relationship between workaholism and workplace aggressive behaviour: The role of job-related emotion.
In this study, I have delineated the theoretical and empirical distinctiveness between workaholism and work engagement by devising an integrative model that includes these concepts' antecedents and consequences.
The result was that extraversion, openness to experience and conscientiousness are personality factors preceding the disposition to flow at work and that neuroticism is the differentiating factor between the onset of psychological well-being or workaholism.
Working ourselves to death: The high cost of workaholism and the rewards of recovery.
Workaholism is dominant in many Gulf countries where expatriates rush to climb the corporate ladder.
Research shows that the concept workaholism share similar descriptions with overcommitment as it characterize individuals that focus on work, even if not at work, (Scott, Moore & Miceli, 1997; Andreassen, Hetland, & Pallesen, 2010) and are extremely involved in their work (Spence and Robbins, 1992).