Wood

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Wood

(wud),
Paul, U.S. cardiologist, 1907-1962. See: Wood units.

Wood

(wud),
Robert, U.S. physicist, 1868-1955. See: Wood glass, Wood lamp, Wood light.

Wood,

(origin unknown).
Romberg-Wood syndrome - see under Romberg, E

wood,

n one of the five phases, or elements, in Chinese cosmologic and medical theory, the characteristic manifestations of which include anger, assertiveness, competition, conflict, creativity, frustration, and leadership.
References in classic literature ?
The woods receded from it on every hand, leaving it lying in a pool of amber sunshine.
When Uncle Blair had finished his sketch the shafts of sunshine were turning crimson and growing more and more remote; the early autumn twilight was falling over the woods.
The whole wood was full of the stir and cries of them.
But now one answers from far woods in a strain made really melodious by distance -- Hoo hoo hoo, hoorer hoo; and indeed for the most part it suggested only pleasing associations, whether heard by day or night, summer or winter.
It is a sound admirably suited to swamps and twilight woods which no day illustrates, suggesting a vast and undeveloped nature which men have not recognized.
A dozen plans for escape ran through David's head, but when Jesse stopped the horse and climbed over the fence into the wood, he followed.
He set aside the hatchet and picked up the plane to make the wood smooth and even, but as he drew it to and fro, he heard the same tiny voice.
And she told him that looking out of her little window she had seen her brothers flying over the wood in the shape of swans, and she showed him the feathers which they had let fall in the yard, and which she had collected.
cried Simon to a borzoi that was pushing forward out of the wood.
The count and Simon galloped out of the wood and saw on their left a wolf which, softly swaying from side to side, was coming at a quiet lope farther to the left to the very place where they were standing.
One part was open, and by that I had crept in; but now I covered every crevice by which I might be perceived with stones and wood, yet in such a manner that I might move them on occasion to pass out; all the light I enjoyed came through the sty, and that was sufficient for me.
On examining my dwelling, I found that one of the windows of the cottage had formerly occupied a part of it, but the panes had been filled up with wood.