withdrawn behavior

withdrawn behavior

a condition in which there is a blunting of the emotions and a lack of social responsiveness.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some researchers believe that socially withdrawn behavior reflects underlying thoughts and feelings of social anxiety, loneliness, insecurity, and depression (Rubin, Chen, and Hymel, 1993; Rubin, Chen, McDougall, Bowker, and McKinnon, 1995).
For example, About bullying, Divorce, Difficult or withdrawn behavior, School (choice), Relationships, Sexuality and drugs.
HOPI revealed that 3 weeks back, the patient was developing withdrawn behavior, was interacting less than usual with family members, was irritable and sleeping less than usual.
After spending two weeks on the post, he just once recalled the names of his relatives loudly and showed slightly withdrawn behavior from his daily routine.
Another study using the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) reported a positive association between prenatal DnBP and BBzP exposure and clinically withdrawn behavior in 3-year-old children (Whyatt et al.
Passive withdrawn behavior means isolating oneself from the peer group (Rubin, Burgess, & Coplan, 2002).
Common signs to watch out for vary from outright defiance, disobedience and misconduct to more subtle indicators like timid and withdrawn behavior, lack of self-confidence and esteem, lack of eye contact and communication, lack of social skills, sudden changes in eating and sleeping patters, frequent mood swings to include bouts of irritation and depression etc.
Autism appears in the entry for "Schizophrenia, childhood type," which notes that "the condition may be manifested by autistic, atypical and withdrawn behavior.
Prenatal exposures to three of the phthalates were also significantly associated with behavior problems including emotionally reactive behavior, anxiety/depression, somatic complaints and withdrawn behavior.
NPH can cause impaired memory, difficulty focusing, withdrawn behavior, and apathy--all symptoms that are also associated with depression.
with the grieving teens exhibiting more withdrawn behavior, as well as
In fact, positive peer reporting has received favorable reviews and recommendations as a key component for treating socially withdrawn behavior, the context in which it is most frequently used (Rosenberg, Wilson, Maheady, & Sindelar, 1992; Skinner et al.