withdrawal


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

withdrawal

 [with-draw´al]
1. a pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement, as may occur in avoidant, schizoid, or schizotypal personality disorders.
2. the removal of something.
3. a substance-specific substance-induced disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication. Specific withdrawal syndromes include those for alcohol, amphetamines or similarly acting sympathomimetics, cocaine, nicotine, opioids, and sedatives, hypnotics, or antianxiety agents. Called also abstinence syndrome, withdrawal symptoms, and withdrawal syndrome.



The usual reactions to alcohol withdrawal are anxiety, weakness, gastrointestinal symptoms, nausea and vomiting, tremor, fever, rapid heartbeat, convulsions, and delirium (see also delirium tremens). Similar effects are produced by withdrawal of barbiturates and in this case convulsions occur frequently, often followed by psychosis with hallucinations. Treatment of withdrawal consists of providing a substitute drug such as a mild sedative, along with treatment of the symptoms as needed. Parenteral fluids are often required.
substance withdrawal withdrawal (def. 3).
withdrawal syndrome former name for withdrawal (def. 3).
thought withdrawal the delusion that someone or something is removing thoughts from one's mind.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl),
1. The act of removal or retreat.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
2. A psychological and/or physical syndrome caused by the abrupt cessation of the use of a drug in an habituated person.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
3. The therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug to avoid the symptoms of withdrawal (2).
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.
4. A pattern of behavior observed in schizophrenia and depression, characterized by a pathologic retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement and leading to self-preoccupation.
See also: withdrawal symptoms, withdrawal syndrome.

withdrawal

/with·draw·al/ (with-drawl´)
1. pathological retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement.

substance withdrawal  a substance-specific mental disorder that follows the cessation of use or reduction in intake of a psychoactive substance that had been regularly used to induce a state of intoxication.

withdrawal

(wĭth-drô′əl, wĭth-)
n.
1.
a. Discontinuance of the use of a drug or other substance, especially one that is addictive.
b. The physiological and mental reaction to such discontinuance, often characterized by distressing symptoms: is going through withdrawal from opioids.
2. Coitus interruptus.

withdrawal

[withdrô′əl]
Etymology: ME, with + drawen, to take away
a common response to physical danger or severe stress characterized by a state of apathy, lethargy, depression, retreat into oneself, and in grave cases, catatonia and stupor. It is pathological if it interferes with a person's perception of reality and ability to function in society, such as in the various forms of schizophrenia. See also schizophrenia.

withdrawal

The participant-/subject-/patient-initiated act of ending participation in a clinical study, which can range from complete withdrawal from study procedures and follow-up to withdrawal from study-related interventions, while permitting continued access to his or her medical records or identifiable information.

Per FDA regulations, when a subject withdraws from a study, the data collected on the subject to the point of withdrawal remain part of the study database and may not be removed.

withdrawal

Psychology A retreat from interpersonal contact, which may be a normal reaction–eg, to uncomfortable social situations or unemployment, or a sign of mental disorders–eg, schizophrenia, depression, bipolar disorder Substance abuse A specific constellation of signs and Sx due to the abrupt cessation of, or reduction in, regularly administered opioids; opioid withdrawal is characterized by 3 or more of the following Sx that develop within hrs to several days after abrupt cessation of the substance:
1. Dysphoric mood,.
2. N&V,.
3. muscle aches & abdominal cramps,.
4. lacrimation or rhinorrhea,.
5. pupillary dilation, piloerection or sweating,.
6. diarrhea,.
7. yawning,.
8. fever,.
9. insomnia. See Alcohol withdrawal syndrome, Physical dependence.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl)
1. The act of removal or retreat.
2. A psychological and physical syndrome caused by the abrupt cessation of the use of a drug in a habituated person.
3. The therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug so as to avoid withdrawal (2).
4. A pattern of behavior observed in schizophrenia and depression, characterized by a pathologic retreat from interpersonal contact and social involvement and leading to self-preoccupation.
5. Synonym(s): coitus interruptus.

Withdrawal

Those side effects experienced by a person who has become physically dependent on a substance, upon decreasing the substance's dosage or discontinuing its use.

with·draw·al

(with-draw'ăl)
1. Act of removal or retreat.
2. Psychological and/or physical syndrome caused by abrupt cessation of use of a drug in an habituated person.
3. Therapeutic process of discontinuing a drug to avoid the symptoms of withdrawal.

withdrawal (abstinence) syndrome,

n the somatic and psychosomatic symptoms recognizable after the abrupt termination of regular drug or other substance use. The types of symptoms are specific to the type of the withdrawn substance.

withdrawal

pharmaceutically speaking, cessation of treatment with a particular drug.

withdrawal reflex
see flexor reflex.
withdrawal time
time interval after cessation of treatment before the animal or any of its products can be used as human food. Based on determination of the time interval required for tissue levels of the substance to fall below critical levels as decreed by legislation. Called also withholding period.

Patient discussion about withdrawal

Q. ALCOHOL WITHDRAWAL what are the symtoms of it?

A. thank you dagmar--i hope this answer will help people to understand what this drug can do to you---peace---mrfoot56

Q. I may be healthier now, but miserable… I’ve not been smoking for a whole month (my longest period in the last decade), and I do feel a bit better physically, but it seems that I lost the joy of life – I don’t go out with my friends any more (because they’re all smokers), I envy other smokers, and generally I feel nervous and dull. Will it be like that forever or is there hope?

A. Well, try to think about what are you missing? The foul smell? The yellow teeth? The feeling of suffocating next morning? Whenever you feel longing to cigarettes, try to think again why you stopped smoking- and it’d help you to keep with it.

More discussions about withdrawal
References in periodicals archive ?
As a true probability-based approach, systematic withdrawals offers a lot of possibility for those families and advisors who wish to understand its many nuances.
The deferred withdrawal facility will replace the existing phased-withdrawal system under which the lump-sum amount can be withdrawn in a phased manner, with a minimum of 10 per cent of the lump-sum amount every year till turning 70.
Other recent studies have shown broader portfolio diversification and rebalancing strategies also can have a significant impact on initial withdrawal rates.
The only way to determine if a baby is experiencing withdrawal or toxicity is with therapeutic drug monitoring, which currently is not practiced in newborns anywhere.
Knowing more about actual withdrawals from VAs with GMWBs, annuitizations from VAs with GMIBs, and persistency for VAs with GMABs--as well as the intermediate behaviors involving step-ups and cash flow--is extremely helpful to insurers assessing and managing the long-terms risks of these benefits.
Marijuana withdrawal is associated with neurovegetative symptoms, such as loss of appetite that can result in transient weight loss; trouble sleeping or sleep disrupted by strange dreams; and physical malaise, such as abdominal discomfort, chills, and feeling "shaky.
Caveat: Although individuals may be eligible to withdraw money from their retirement plans as a result of Hurricane Katrina, their plans may not permit early withdrawals.
Doctors who treat patients with chronic migraine and MOH need to look very closely within the first year after withdrawal to see whether the frequency of headaches requires preventive treatment," he said.
Howard Dean and Nancy Pelosi, who at least say out loud that Bush made a terrible blunder by waging the war against Iraq, nevertheless shrink before advocating withdrawal.
For such withdrawals, individuals may withdraw only their own deferred income, not any earnings generated by investing the income, and they must pay ordinary income taxes on the withdrawal [IRC Sec.