winter tick

winter tick

see dermacentoralbipictus.
References in periodicals archive ?
McBride has heard information from the MNR and discussed a number of potential causes, including the impact of the winter tick and climate change, and believes building a working relationship with the MNR is a good step toward the community playing a role in returning moose populations to healthy levels.
The winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) is a unique blood-feeding ectoparasite that periodically causes severe mortality in moose (Alces alces) populations (Cameron and Fulton 1926-27, Samuel and Barker 1979).
Another common tick associated with white-tailed deer in middle Tennessee is the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus Packard).
Premature hair loss by moose (Alces alces) in winter that is associated with infestations of winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) is well documented (e.
Hunter contributions could provide a much more accurate assessment of our local winter tick population.
This information will increase understanding of the metabolic impacts during late winter and early spring weather when moribund and dead moose with severe winter tick infestations are most frequently observed in the wild.
Mortality of their radio-collared moose was mostly due to winter kill/parasites (41%) associated with winter tick infestations; mortality due to hunting, road-kill, poaching, predation, and weather was not considered major during the 4-year study.
Rines notes moose "dropping dead from anemia, a lack of healthy red blood cells, the result of winter tick infestation.
graduate of the University of Minnesota, received the Newcomer Award, and Bill Samuel, of winter tick fame and long-time conference attendee and recently retired from the University of Alberta, received the Senior Travel Award.
Research should address impacts of parasitism by winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus) and brain-worm (Parelaphostrongylus tennis) on productivity and mortality of moose, influence of climate change on population dynamics and range, and conflicts in areas with high human population density.
Of several parasites known in moose (Lankester and Samuel 2007), only 2 (liver fluke and winter tick [Dermacentor albipictus]) have come to be associated with dead or sick animals during moose population declines.
A 30-second tick count was performed along the dorsal midline posterior to the neck of each moose to estimate the severity of winter tick (Dermacantor albipictus) infestations.