winter tick

winter tick

see dermacentoralbipictus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Specifically, wildlife biologists are concerned that warmer falls and early springs are increasing winter tick numbers that can have detrimental effects on moose.
ABSTRACT: Recruitment of winter tick larvae (Dermacentor albipictus) was studied in a forest opening and a closed canopy deciduous forest to evaluate their potential as sources of tick infestation to moose (Alces alces).
The steep declines in moose numbers in Minnesota, and high burdens of winter tick and associated mortality in the Northeast, have made this assessment of Adirondack moose a high priority.
McBride has heard information from the MNR and discussed a number of potential causes, including the impact of the winter tick and climate change, and believes building a working relationship with the MNR is a good step toward the community playing a role in returning moose populations to healthy levels.
Winter tick Dermacentor albipictus associated hair loss/damage (Samuel & Barker 1979, Samuel 2004) and degree of lungworm Dictyocaulus viviparus infestation and associated lung tissue damage (e.
albipictus, the horse tick or winter tick, is found in the northern United States and Canada and feeds on elk, moose, horses, and deer causing winter tick infestations.
The winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus, has become widely distributed because horses now are commonly transported from one part of the country to another.
Another common tick associated with white-tailed deer in middle Tennessee is the winter tick (Dermacentor albipictus Packard).
If wallowing is to reduce ectoparasite load, wallowing activity should peak at the time of greatest infestation rates or in early summer (May or J une) if in response to the American dog tick (Dermacentor variabilis) or the lone star tick (Amblyomma americanum) and peak in early and late winter if in response to the winter tick (D.
Hunter contributions could provide a much more accurate assessment of our local winter tick population.
Evaluating the usefulness of three indices for assessing winter tick abundance in northern New Hampshire.