wing


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wing

(wing),
1. One of the vertebrate forelimbs adapted for flying, as in bats and birds.
2. Any appendage adapted for flying, as in insects.
3. Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala (1)
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

(wĭng)
n.
1. Any of various paired movable organs of flight, as that of a bird or insect.
2. Something that resembles a wing in appearance, function, or position relative to a main body.

wing

(wing) [TA]
1. The anterior appendage of a bird.
2. anatomy Ala (q.v.).
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

  1. either of the modified fore limbs of a bird that are covered with large feathers and specialized for flight in most species.
  2. one of the organs of flight of an insect, consisting of a membranous outgrowth from the thorax containing a network of veins.
  3. either of the organs of flight in certain other animals, especially the forelimb of a bat.

wing

(wing) [TA]
Any flattened, laterally projecting process.
Synonym(s): ala.
[Fr. Middle English winge, wenge, from Old Norse vaenger, wing]

wing

a modified limb suitable for generating aerodynamic lift. Wing membranes or patagia are stretched between bony elements. In birds the wing surface is increased by large flight feathers (remiges) borne on the hand (primaries) or ulna (secondaries). In bats the patagia are more extensive than in birds through enlargement of the bones of the hand.

wing amputation
the extreme form of deflighting.
dropped wing
a name for Salmonella typhimurium infection in young pigeons which causes arthritis in the wing.
wing louse
lipeuruscaponis.
wing vein
cutaneous ulnar vein; on the under surface of the extended wing, the favored location for venepuncture in most avian species.
References in classic literature ?
On the grassy bank Wing Biddlebaum had tried again to drive his point home.
Out of the dream Wing Biddlebaum made a pic- ture for George Willard.
Pausing in his speech, Wing Biddlebaum looked long and earnestly at George Willard.
As Bradley gazed upon them in wide-eyed astonishment, he saw plainly that all his intelligence, all his acquired knowledge through years of observation and experience were set at naught by the simple evidence of the fact that stood out glaringly before his eyes--the creatures' wings were not mechanical devices but as natural appendages, growing from their shoulderblades, as were their arms and legs.
As he sat gazing at them, one of the two awoke, separated his wings to release his arms that had been folded across his breast, placed his hands upon the floor, dropped his feet and stood erect.
The creature stood about the height of an average man but appeared much taller from the fact that the joints of his long wings rose fully a foot above his hairless head.
You want to wear your wings, you know, and your other things.
I haven't got a rag to wear but this robe and the wings.
The many-colored shadows of the fairest flowers played on the pure white walls, and fountains sparkled in the sunlight, making music as the cool waves rose and fell, while to and fro, with waving wings and joyous voices, went the smiling Elves, bearing fruit and honey, or fragrant garlands for each other's hair.
Delicate and graceful were the little forms, bright the silken hair that fell about each lovely face; and Eva heard the low, sweet murmur of their silvery voices and the rustle of their wings.
Now, Eureka, you'll have to show me the way to those wings.
The watchers waited in breathless suspense until the boy again appeared, his arms now full of the wooden wings.