window


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window

 [win´do]
a circumscribed opening in a plane surface; called also fenestra.
aortic window a radiolucent region below the aortic arch, formed by the bifurcation of the trachea, visible in the left anterior oblique radiograph of the heart and great vessels.
window of cochlea (cochlear window) round window.
oval window an oval opening in the inner wall of the middle ear, which is closed by the stapes; called also vestibular window and fenestra vestibuli.
round window a round opening in the middle ear covered by the secondary tympanic membrane; called also cochlear window and fenestra cochleae.
vestibular window (window of vestibule) oval window.

win·dow

(win'dō),
1.
See also: CT number, window level, window width. Synonym(s): fenestra
2. Any opening in space or time, particularly a critical interval within which a given event must, or cannot, occur.
See also: CT number, window level, window width.
3. computed tomography the range of CT numbers (in Hounsfield units) across which all shades of the gray scale are distributed in a given image so as to emphasize slight differences in x-ray absorption coefficients between tissues of similar density (for example, mediastinal soft tissues).
See also: CT number, window level, window width.

window

/win·dow/ (win´do)
1. a circumscribed opening in a plane surface.
2. the voltage limits that determine which pulses will be allowed to pass on.

aortic window  a transparent region below the aortic arch, formed by the bifurcation of the trachea, visible in the left anterior oblique radiograph of the heart and great vessels.
oval window  fenestra vestibuli.
round window  fenestra cochleae.

window

Etymology: AS, wind, air, owe, eye
1 a surgically created opening in the surface of a structure or an anatomically occurring opening in the surface or between the chambers of a structure.
2 a specific time period during which a phenomenon can be observed, a reaction monitored, or a procedure initiated.
adjective Referring to an interruption in time or space
noun An interruption in time or space
verb To create an interruption in space
Cytology A narrow, slit-like clear space between 2 moulded mesothelial cells, which may be joined to each other by 'articulations'
Imaging noun An interval of photon energies used in a scintillation counter—gamma-ray detector; the so-called ‘pulse height analyser’ rejects any photon energy falling outside of the window—and is thus not counted
verb To adjust a field for optimal visualisation by an imaging modality
Physiology An opening in a biologic membrane, through which solutes may be transported
Surgery A point of an abscess in closest contact with the abdominal wall—or any accessible skin surface without an intervening visceral organ, which can be opened for safe drainage

window

adjective Referring to an interruption in time or space. See Core window, Fertilization window, Round window, Square window, Therapeutic window Radiology An interval of photon energies used in a scintillation counter–gamma-ray detector; the so-called 'pulse height analyzer' rejects any photon energy falling outside of the window–and is thus not counted SurgeryA region of an abscess in closest contact with the abdominal wall–or any accessible skin surface without an intervening visceral organ, which can be opened for relatively safe drainage.

fe·nes·tra

, pl. fenestrae (fĕ-nes'tră, -trē)
1. An anatomic aperture, often closed by a membrane.
2. An opening left in a cast or other form of fixed dressing to permit access to a wound or inspection of the part.
3. The opening in one of the blades of an obstetric forceps.
4. A lateral opening in the sheath of an endoscopic instrument that allows lateral viewing or operative maneuvering through the sheath.
5. Openings in the wall of a tube, catheter, or trocar designed to promote better flow of air or fluids.
Synonym(s): window.
[L. window]

win·dow

(win'dō)
1. Synonym(s): fenestra.
2. Any opening in space or time, particularly a critical interval within which a given event must, or cannot, occur.
3. In computed tomography, range of CT numbers (expressed in Hounsfield units) across which all shades of the gray scale are distributed in a given image so as to emphasize slight differences in x-ray absorption coefficients between tissues of similar density (e.g., mediastinal soft tissues).

window

a circumscribed opening in a plane surface.

cochlear window, fenestra cochleae
an aperture between the tympanic cavity of the middle ear and the cochlea of the internal ear; covered by the secondary tympanic membrane. Called also round window.
oval window
an oval opening in the inner wall of the middle ear, which is closed by the stapes; called also fenestra vestibuli.
round window
see cochlear window (above).

Patient discussion about window

Q. what is the window phase for HIV?

A. The 'window' period for HIV infection describes the strong immune defense that reduces the number of viral particles in the blood stream, marking the start of the infection's clinical latency stage. Clinical latency can vary between two weeks and 20 years. During this early phase of infection, HIV is active within lymphoid organs, where large amounts of virus become trapped in the follicular dendritic cells. The surrounding tissues that are rich in CD4+ T cells may also become infected, and viral particles accumulate both in infected cells and as free virus. Individuals who are in this phase are still infectious.

More discussions about window
References in classic literature ?
that I will drink a whole bottle of rum without taking it from my mouth, sitting outside the window on this spot" (he stooped and pointed to the sloping ledge outside the window) "and without holding on to anything.
On the narrow leaden roof, which ran along past the bedrooms, and which was rather less, I should think, than three feet below the sills of the window, a row of flower-pots was ranged, with wide intervals between each pot--the whole being protected from falling in high winds by an ornamental iron railing along the edge of the roof.
It seems clear to you, then, Monsieur, that the murderer escaped --nobody knows how--by the window in the vestibule?
Tod's proceedings were peculiar, and rather uneasy, (because the bed was between the window and the door of the bedroom).
Across the road beyond the green palings and the close-cropped lawn, behind the curtains of their creeper-framed windows, sat the two old ladies, Miss Bertha and Miss Monica Williams, looking out as from a private box at all that was being enacted before them.
The other two officers were not dead or mortally wounded, but Macbride lay with a broken leg and his ladder on top of him, evidently thrown down from the top window of the tower; while Wilson lay on his face, quite still as if stunned, with his red head among the gray and silver of the sea holly.
When we had finished eating we went softly upstairs to my study, and I looked again out of the open window.
The climate had kept its promise, and the change of season from winter to spring had made very little difference, so that Helen, who was sitting in the drawing-room with a pen in her hand, could keep the windows open though a great fire of logs burnt on one side of her.
At first Mary thought that there were no lights at all in the windows, but as she got out of the carriage she saw that one room in a corner upstairs showed a dull glow.
If you will kindly step round here behind me, in the gloom of the room, and will cast your eye at the second-floor landing window in yonder house, I think you will hardly fail to see a slinking individual in whom I recognise our local friend.
Sikes had him down, and his knee was on his throat, when Crackit pulled him back with a look of alarm, and pointed to the window.
As for me, I had seen that sight too often, through the little window, at the time of the rosy hours of Mazenderan; and I cared only for what was being said next door, seeking for a hint how to act, what resolution to take.