will


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Related to will: William Hill

will

 [wil]
a legal declaration of a person's wishes, usually regarding disposal of possessions after the person has died.
living will advance directives.

will

(wil),
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

Etymology: AS, wyllan
1 the mental faculty that enables one to consciously choose or decide on a course of action.
2 the act or process of exercising the power of choice.
3 a wish, desire, or deliberate intention.
4 a disposition or attitude toward another or others.
5 determination or purpose; willfulness.
6 (in law) an expression or declaration of a person's wishes as to the disposition of property to be performed or take effect after death. Also called volition.

will

Forensics
“The legal expression or declaration of a person’s mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death”.

Medspeak-UK
A document which sets out who is to benefit from an individual’s property and possessions (estate) after his or her death. It also ensures that the estate is passed as intended, after taxes and debts have been paid.

Vox populi
Desire or volition (as in the “will to live”).

will

1. Desire, volition, as in the 'will to live', see there.
2. 'The legal expression or declaration of a person's mind or wishes as to the disposition of his property, to be performed or take effect after his death'. See Advance directive, Living will.

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will

(wil)
A legal document expressing the writer's wishes for the disposal of personal property after death.
[M.E., fr. O.E. willa]

will,

n a legal document detailing one's wishes in the disposal of one's body and property and the care of one's minor children and dependents.
will, living,
n a document that details one's wishes regarding the degree and amount of health care desired if one becomes mentally incapacitated.
References in classic literature ?
I guess I can get from here to Yarmouth, and from there I can charter something which will take me to the other side.
If you will drink no more wine, let us have our coffee in the library, you and I.
Anything's possible with a man cracked enough to make freak wills and not cracked enough to have them disputed on the ground of insanity.
This seems to have soured the old boy on the nephew, for in the first of his wills that I've seen--you remember I told you I had seen three--he leaves the niece the pile and the nephew only gets twenty pounds.
It looks to me as if these eccentric wills of old Nutcombe's came in cycles, as it were.
PHILADELPHIA, July 21, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Wills Eye Hospital is listed Top in Ophthalmology Nationwide once again this year on the much sought-after U.
After drafting the will and arriving at the DIFC courts to register it, they need to bring in a witness, and an ID.
He held the knife against my throat and said I hate you, I will f*** kill you.
He will work directly on the team of Executive Managing Director Eric Yarbro.
Those of us who go back to the nascency of NCR in the mid-1960s remember Garry Wills as the paper's conservative columnist.
Recent research showed us that 73% of people in Newcastle don't have a will and more than half of people in the city don't know how much they may inherit from loved ones.
One of the church's most noted inside critics, historian Garry Wills, shows no signs of slowing at nearly 80 years old.