crane

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crane

large, gray, brown and white, long-legged, long-necked birds, with a loud raucous call. Includes Ballearica spp. (e.g. B. pavonina, the eastern crowned crane), grus, Bugeranus spp. and Anthropoides spp. (e.g. A. virgo, the desmoiselle crane).
References in periodicals archive ?
Editor's note: Additional information on whooping crane reintroduction efforts can be found at the Louisiana Ecological Services Field Office, the North Florida Ecological Services Field Office, and the Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries websites.
River bottom roosting sites for the lanky, rusty gray birds are at a premium, as is habitat for whooping cranes (the sandhills' larger and ultra-rare relatives) and other migrant and resident wildlife.
On May 23, 1967, Ray Erickson from Patuxent WRC and Ernie Kuyt from the Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) collected three eggs from whooping crane nests at Canada's Wood Buffalo National Park and delivered them to Patuxent WRC to start the captive breeding flock.
Stepping momentarily away from the clinical trials setting, a case study entitled, "The effects of anticoagulant choice and sample processing time on hematologic values of juvenile whooping cranes," from 20101 describes the collection of blood from these birds and the dependence of test results on a number of factors.
The whooping crane is an endangered species and a subject of extensive conservation efforts, therefore it is desirable to have a better understanding of the relative importance of various food items in its diet.
guidance for a potential whooping crane HCP, the discussion then turns
7) 9 The wild whooping crane population is still at risk from habitat loss, pollution, collision with power lines, predation, low genetic diversity, parasites, and disease.
Caption: Sara, the federally endangered whooping crane (Grus Americana).
In 2010 and 2011, we attempted to make between one and four observations per day of whooping crane chicks/families between hatch and fledge/mortality; four per day for age 1-14 days, three per day for age 14-28 days, two per day for age 29-42 days and one per day after that.
Resource managers continue to apply restoration techniques over large areas of the central Platte River to create and maintain habitat for endangered and threatened species of migratory birds: the Whooping Crane, Interior Least Tern (Sterna antillarum athalassos), and Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus) (NRC, 2005), as well as Sandhill Cranes and grassland birds.
So much so that people fly to foreign destinations to track down rare species and drive to locations where they are likely to spot a whooping crane or vermillion flycatcher.