whole grains

whole grains

A general term for grains (oats, rice, wheat) from which the outer cellulose layer (bran) has not been removed; bran is removed by milling, resulting in white flour and white rice, which, in the process, removes dietary fibre and nutrients.

whole grains

(hōl grānz)
Grains that have not been processed to take away the outer layer where many nutrients lie.
References in periodicals archive ?
April 30, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Nature's Harvest bread is making it a whole lot easier for families to get whole grains into their diet by making its great-tasting varieties such as Honey Wheat and Butter Top Made with Whole Grain White Bread nationally available.
That is because April 1 marks the fourth annual Whole Grains Sampling Day, a day when supermarkets, restaurants, schools, manufacturers and organizations are encouraged by the Boston-based nonprofit Oldways and its Whole Grain Council (WGC) to offer a multitude of special promotions and low-cost or no-cost whole grain items.
Eating more whole grains may be associated with reduced mortality, especially deaths due to cardiovascular disease (CVD), but not cancer deaths, according to a report published online by JAMA Internal Medicine.
Firstly, the Whole Grain Stamp, a packaging symbol for products containing at least 8 grams of whole grains per serving (created by the Whole Grain Council, a non-governmental organization supported by industry dues).
QUETTA -- Eating whole grains is associated with a decreased risk of pre-diabetes, a blood sugar elevation that can precede diabetes in adults, according to new research.
The research presented, which included data from national food surveys undertaken in Ireland, showed that ready to eat breakfast cereals made with whole grains were by far the main contributors to whole grains in the diets of the under 17 year olds.
The Whole Grain Council promotes a '100%' certification stamp for whole grains and a 'Basic' stamp on products made from white flour and added bran or germ.
Consumption of whole grains has been associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease.
Most prospective studies of bran, fiber, and whole grains and the risk of heart disease showed that bran and fiber intake were more protective than whole grain intake.
In short, we should "Increase whole-grain intake by replacing refined grains with whole grains.
People who eat more whole grains have less visceral belly fat, the kind that's linked to a higher risk of heart disease and diabetes.
The average American eats less than one serving of whole grains a day.